Black conservative press releases and news commentary


Black Conservative Groups Commends President for Stem Cell Veto


For Release:
June 22, 2007
Contact: David Almasi at 202/543-4110 x11
or [email protected]


Members of the Project 21 black leadership network hail President George W. Bush's veto of a bill that would allow federal funding to be used for embryonic stem cell research.  Project 21 members stand firmly with the large numbers of Americans who support research in this field of science that does not destroy human life in the process.

In a June 20 White House ceremony that was attended by Project 21 staff director David Almasi, President Bush announced his veto of congressional legislation to allow the federal funding of embryonic stem cell research.  Bush also announced the issuance of an executive order promoting the eligibility of federal funding for other, non-lethal forms of stem cell research.

The veto and executive order do not hinder or prevent any kind of privately funded stem cell research.

In his comments about the veto, President Bush said: "Destroying human life in hopes of saving human life is not ethical, and it is not the only option before us."

"I applaud President Bush's decision to veto the stem cell research funding bill," said Project 21 fellow Deneen Borelli.  "With today's advances in science and technology, more emphasis and research should be aimed at other hopeful alternatives.  Adult stem cells and amniotic stem cells, for example, could have greater therapeutic potential in enhancing and maintaining healthy lifestyles without raising ethical issues."

Project 21, a nonprofit and nonpartisan organization sponsored by the National Center for Public Policy Research, has been a leading voice of the African-American community since 1992.  For more information, contact David Almasi at (202) 543-4110 x11 or [email protected], or visit Project 21's website at http://www.project21.org/P21Index.html.

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