Stay the Course: President Bush Should Continue Sticking with Science on Global Warming

 

DATE: February 11, 2002

BACKGROUND: In what has to be classified as a major blunder, the President's Council of Economic Advisors and other White House advisors are now indicating that global warming is a problem, needlessly painting the President into a corner. Dan Lashof of the Natural Resources Defense Council has already responded in the Houston Chronicle, "they [the administration] are actually acknowledging that global warming is a serious problem that requires some sort of emissions limits. The bad news is they still do not think it's serious enough to cap those emissions."1

TEN SECOND RESPONSE: Important empirical, scientific evidence refutes the notion of global warming as predicted by climate-guessers and their computer models.

THIRTY SECOND RESPONSE: Those who would drag the President into any scheme to restrict carbon dioxide emissions are doing him, his administration and the American people a gross disservice. New, empirical scientific evidence refutes the notion of global warming as predicted by climate-guessers and their computer models. Unnecessary restrictions on carbon dioxide emissions would harm our economy and cost millions of Americans, particularly minorities, their jobs.

DISCUSSION: By saying in their annual report to the President, "We need to recognize that it makes sense to discuss slowing emissions growth before trying to stop and eventually reverse it," the Council of Economic Advisors blundered into a needless quagmire on the issue of global warming.

FOR MORE INFORMATION: For a brief documented discussion of the problem this has created and some direction for a way out, see "Global Warming: Administration Could Snatch Defeat From the Jaws of Victory" at http://www.nationalcenter.org/NPA392.html.

More detailed discussion of the science issues involved can be found in "Global Warming Primer at http://www.nationalcenter.org/NPA361.pdf.

For a comprehensive list of short papers on various aspects of the global warming issue, visit http://www.nationalcenter.org/Kyoto.html.


by Tom Randall, Director
John P. McGovern, MD Center for Environmental and Regulatory Affairs
The National Center for Public Policy Research

Contact the author at: 773-857-5086 or [email protected]
The National Center for Public Policy Research, Chicago office
3712 North Broadway - PMB 279
Chicago, IL 60613



Footnotes:

1 "Global warming proposals given a cool reception," Tony Freemantle, Houston Chronicle.com, downloaded from http://www.chron.com/cs/CDA/printstory.hts/nation/1244370 on February 7, 2002