Larger Public Health Risks Overlooked in the Global Warming Debate, Respected Science Organization Says

Policy Proposals Seek Solution to Hypothetical Health Risks While Ignoring Real Ones

 

For Immediate Release

November 21, 1997

Contact: David Ridenour of The National Center for Public Policy Research at 202/543-4110 or [email protected]

 

The public health "big picture" has largely been overlooked in the current global warming debate, increasing the likelihood that global climate policies will be adopted that either miss good opportunities to advance public health or inadvertently increase public health risks, says a respected science organization.

Researchers have theorized that global warming, if it occurs, could increase human mortality by increasing the incidence of diseases transmitted by mosquitoes and other parasites. But a study released by the American Council on Science and Health (ACSH), "Global Climate Change and Human Health," argues that such diseases will be serious public health problems regardless of whether or not global warming occurs. What's more, these diseases can be prevented - and by more effective means than reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The study also cautions against government action designed solely to counter the hypothetical health risks associated with global warming that could inadvertently exacerbate very real health risks.

Among the American Council on Science and Health's key findings:

For more information on the study, contact the American Council on Science and Health at 212/362-7044. For more information about other aspects of global climate change contact David Ridenour of The National Center for Public Policy Research at 202/543-4110 or e-mail him at [email protected].

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