Starbucks Asked to Protect Employees’ Right to be Politically Active Without Penalty at Work

Justin Danhof, general counsel of the National Center for Public Policy Research and director of its Free Enterprise Project, addressed the CEO, board and shareholders of Starbucks at Starbucks’ 2016 shareholder meeting on March 23, 2016.

StarbucksLogoShareholders were asked to vote for a human rights proposal and to support a policy change at Starbucks to protect employees from workplace retribution if they engage in legal political or civic activities outside of the workplace, on their own time, even if their superior holds differing views.

Justin’s presentation was part of the National Center’s Employee Conscience Protection Project, which, among other activities promoting human rights, has so far convinced 13 major corporations employing over 5 million workers to agree not to penalize or fire employees based on their legal political or civic activities undertaken in their free time.

Justin’s remarks at the Starbucks meeting, as prepared for delivery, are available here.

More information about the National Center’s presentation at Starbucks and its Employee Protection Policy Project is available here.



The National Center for Public Policy Research, founded in 1982, is a non-partisan, free-market, independent conservative think-tank. Ninety-four percent of its support comes from individuals, less than four percent from foundations and less than two percent from corporations. It receives over 350,000 individual contributions a year from over 60,000 active recent contributors.