STEVE MILLOY

ADJUNCT FELLOW

National Center for Public Policy Research Adjunct Fellow Steve Milloy is a recognized leader in the fight against junk science, with more than 25 years of experience reaching across many professional fields.

Milloy is an expert on energy, environmental and public health issues. He has training in the natural sciences, biostatistics, law and securities regulation. He has effectively relayed this expertise in roles that have included public affairs consultant, author, TV/radio commentator and speaker. He recently worked on the Trump Administration transition team for the Environmental Protection Agency. Additionally, he has served as an attorney for the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission as well as a broker-dealer, a registered securities principal and investment fund manager. He has also been a non-profit executive, print/web columnist on science and business issues and an executive in the mining industry.

Credited with popularizing the term “junk science,” Milloy is the founder and publisher of JunkScience.com. JunkScience.com has garnered numerous awards, including being named a “Top Resource” and one of the “Most Popular” health news websites by Yahoo!; “One of the 50 Best Web Sites of 1998” by Popular Science magazine and a “Hot Pick” by the Science – the journal of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Milloy has testified on risk assessment and Superfund issues before the U.S. Congress, and has lectured before numerous organizations.

Between 2000 and 2009, Milloy wrote the popular “Junk Science” column for FOXNews.com. He has written more than 500 published commentaries on a variety of business and science topics. He is also the author of the books Scare Pollution: Why and How to Fix the EPA and Junk Science Judo: Self-defense Against Health Scares and Scams.

Featured Appearances by Steve Milloy

The National Center for Public Policy Research, founded in 1982, is a non-partisan, free-market, independent conservative think-tank. Ninety-four percent of its support comes from individuals, less than four percent from foundations and less than two percent from corporations. It receives over 350,000 individual contributions a year from over 60,000 active recent contributors.