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LATEST NEWS FROM PROJECT 21

Mastercard Unable to Defend Its Support for Marxist Group "Black Lives Matter"

Mastercard Unable to Defend Its Support for Marxist Group “Black Lives Matter”

Press Release /
“There Are Plenty of Positive Ways for Mastercard to Show Its Support for Minorities Without Embracing a Hate Group,” says Horace Cooper Washington, D.C. – ...
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A Rare Moment When Jesse Jackson is Right!

A Rare Moment When Jesse Jackson is Right!

ConservativeBlog.org /
While Project 21 member Donna Jackson rarely finds herself in agreement with anything Jesse Jackson does, she writes in a new Townhall commentary that “he’s ...
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Standing Up for Those Who Stand Against Lawlessness

Standing Up for Those Who Stand Against Lawlessness

ConservativeBlog.org /
Declaring that left-wing anti-police protesters are on a broader “quest to demonize traditional American values,” prominent conservatives have joined with the Conservative Partnership Institute in ...
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Blueprint for a Better Deal for Black America

About Project 21

Project 21 is an initiative of The National Center for Public Policy Research to promote the views of African-Americans whose entrepreneurial spirit, dedication to family and commitment to individual responsibility have not traditionally been echoed by the nation’s civil rights establishment.

Project 21 participants have been interviewed by hundreds of media outlets, including the O’Reilly Factor, Hannity and Colmes, the CNN Morning News, Black Entertainment Television’s Lead Story, America’s Black Forum, the McLaughlin Group, C-SPAN’s Morning Journal and the Rush Limbaugh, Michael Reagan, Sean Hannity, G. Gordon Liddy and Larry King shows, as well as in newspapers such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, The Washington Times and many others.

Project 21 participants live all over the U.S. and have a variety of careers. What they have in common is a desire to make America a better place for African-Americans, and all Americans, to live and work. Project 21 members do this in a variety of ways in their own communities, and, through Project 21, by writing opinion editorials for newspapers, participating in public policy discussions on radio and television, by participating in policy panels, by giving speeches before student, business and community groups, and by advising policymakers at the national, state and local levels.

Project 21: A History

Project 21 is an initiative of The National Center for Public Policy Research to promote the views of African-Americans whose entrepreneurial spirit, sense of family and commitment to individual responsibility have not traditionally been echoed by the nation’s civil rights establishment. This became most obvious during the April 1992 riots in Los Angeles, when the media provided extended coverage of the reaction of liberal civil rights leaders to the events surrounding the Rodney King controversy. Curiously, the media made little mention of those in the African-American community who spoke out in favor of law and order and individual responsibility – and against the rioting.

Rather than merely complain about the lack of attention given to conservative and moderate African-Americans as typified by the coverage of the riots, The National Center for Public Policy Research convened a meeting of conservative and moderate African-American activists in mid-1992 to determine whether it was feasible to construct a network to bring conservative and moderate voices in the black community to the attention of the media. The answer was yes, and Project 21 was born. By March of 1993, Project 21 secured the necessary funding to hire a full-time coordinator to pursue its goals. Project 21’s mission includes the active promotion of conservative and moderate viewpoints by Project 21’s network of members in the media, and the ongoing recruitment of new members to be promoted.

Project 21 acts as a public relations network for moderate and conservative African-Americans, and is interested in promoting those African-Americans who want to discuss their beliefs not only in the privacy of their own homes but in thousands, sometimes millions, of homes across America. Whether a member is a talented writer, articulate speaker, dedicated policy analyst or just have interesting viewpoints on important issues, Project 21 is there to help its members get recognition.

Project 21 has enjoyed enormous success. Project 21’s network of African-American moderates and conservatives have been interviewed by hundreds of newspapers, talk radio shows and television programs throughout the country. Participants have been featured on such programs as CNN & Company, CNN Morning News, The McLaughlin Group, C-SPAN’s Morning Journal, Larry King, Rush Limbaugh, The Michael Reagan Show, BET’s Our Voices, and America’s Black Forum as well as in newspapers such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, The Washington Times, The Detroit News, USA Today, The Cleveland Plain-Dealer, and many others.

Project 21 members have been published, quoted or interviewed over 35,000 times since the program was launched in 1992.

Project 21 first burst into attention following the release of Black America 1994: Changing Direction in January 1994. A 77-page volume, Black America 1994 is a comprehensive assessment of the challenges and opportunities facing the African-American community. A collection of 15 essays written by Project 21 participants, the report addressed important contemporary issues including economic stagnation, crime, education, health, welfare, and the disintegration of the black family.

In the weeks following the report’s release, its contributors participated in several hundred media interviews, and Project 21 received nearly 5,000 requests for information and numerous offers of support.

Project 21 released a major report, The Health Care Ghetto: African-Americans and Health Care Reform, at a National Press Club press conference in August, 1994. The report was the first of its kind to analyze how various health care reform initiatives would affect minority communities.

In January 1995, Project 21 released a second annual report: Black America 1995: A New Beginning. The report consisted of 38 essays by Project 21 members on topics ranging from the information superhighway to crime. In January 1996, a series of profiles were released of black conservatives and moderates who shun government spending and embrace greater community involvement as the way to solve problems. Black America 1996: A Time for Renewal also included an agenda created by black conservatives and moderates outlining what government needs to do – and what it needs to stop doing – if people are going to start solving their own problems.

In 1997, following two years of research, Project 21 released an in-depth report: Black America 1997: How Government Harms Charities… And How Some are Succeeding Anyway. Until now, it has not been widely known that humanitarian groups suffer from government’s regulatory harassment. The 90-page report received front page newspaper coverage in Washington D.C. and led to calls from lawmakers interested in repealing the regulations that harm the ability of charities to help the poor.

Project 21 also has taken a lead role in bringing to public attention the fact that a substantial number of government environmental rules have a disproportionately negative economic impact on minorities. In addition to assisting with the research and publication of over 60 studies, op-eds and press releases on this topic in recent years, in 2002, joining with the John P. McGovern Center for Environmental and Regulatory Affairs to form a Center for Environmental Justice, Project 21 released a comprehensive econometric analysis of the impact of so-called “smart growth” regulations on minorities. The study, “Smart Growth and Its Effects on Housing Markets: The New Segregation” was published in November, 2002.

Project 21 is also actively involved in educating the public on proposals to empower communities rather than the government. For instance, Project 21 was instrumental in promoting the ideas incorporated in the Community Renewal Act, sponsored by Reps. Jim Talent (R-MO) and J.C. Watts (R-OK) in the 105th Congress. Project 21’s Contract with Black America, proposed to the leadership of the Republican Congress in January 1995, started the process that eventually led to the crafting of the Community Renewal Act.

Press Releases

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New Visions Commentary

Carnivore is Hungry for Your Privacy, by Michael King

New Visions Commentary /
A New Visions Commentary paper published August 2000 by The National Center for Public Policy Research, 501 Capitol Ct., N.E., Washington, DC 20002, 202/543-4110, Fax 202-543-5975, E-Mail [email protected], Web http://www.nationalcenter.org. Reprints permitted provided source is credited. Carnivore is hungry, and it's looking for food. What is Carnivore? It is a device that the FBI uses to snoop on your e-mail and behavior on the Internet. It is the biggest threat to your privacy that has come down the pike in a long time. Carnivore is a software/hardware combination, meaning it's both programming and machine. When installed on an Internet Service ...
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Raynard Johnson and the Ghosts of Mississippi, by Kimberley Jane Wilson

New Visions Commentary /
On June 16, Jerry Johnson was confronted by every good parent's nightmare. Hanging from a pecan tree in his front yard was the body of his youngest child, his boy, Raynard. Seventeen-year-old Raynard was handsome, got good grades and was well-liked. Still, even teens who seem happy are known to commit suicide. This might have been a private tragedy except for one thing - the Johnson's live in Kokomo, Mississippi. Mississippi has always had a horrid fascination for me. When I was a child, my parents usually spoke of it in serious tones. They came to Washington, D.C. in the ...
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Death Taxes are Killing Black Businesses, by Syd Gernstein

New Visions Commentary /
Do you ever feel like you're being taxed to death? The estates of many Americans are taxed when they die - sometimes creating terrible problems for those still living. And these unfair taxes may be the death of new African-American prosperity. As more Americans reach higher income brackets and open their own businesses, death taxes are an increasing problem. According to figures in Project 21's soon-to-be-published Black America 2000 report, the income levels of black households have tripled in the past 24 years. Black-owned businesses more than doubled in number between 1987 and 1997. This black prosperity and perseverance, however, ...
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“Please Remember Hospice,” by Michael King

New Visions Commentary /
A New Visions Commentary paper published July 2000 by The National Center for Public Policy Research, 501 Capitol Ct., N.E., Washington, DC 20002, 202/543-4110, Fax 202-543-5975, E-Mail [email protected], Web http://www.nationalcenter.org. Reprints permitted provided source is credited. The call came the morning of Easter Sunday as I was working on my "award winning" cheese grits. "Mike." It was my father. He is usually understated. If the world was coming to an end, his tone would be about the same as asking me to pass the butter knife, but this time his voice gave me reason to pause. "How soon can you ...
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Time for Some Child Control, by Kimberley Jane Wilson

New Visions Commentary /
A New Visions Commentary paper published July 2000 by The National Center for Public Policy Research, 501 Capitol Ct., N.E., Washington, DC 20002, 202/543-4110, Fax 202-543-5975, E-Mail [email protected], Web http://www.nationalcenter.org. Reprints permitted provided source is credited. Earlier this year, a six-year-old boy pulled out a gun at school and killed one of his classmates at a school in Mount Morris Township, Michigan. Her name was Kayla Rolland. She was a cute, rosy-cheeked blond girl with intelligent eyes. She came from an apparently normal, loving family. Her killer did not. No, little Dedrick Owens's family could be called a lot of ...
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Bill Clinton Makes Blacks Pay More at the Pump, by Stuart Pigler

New Visions Commentary /
With gasoline prices rising to well over two dollars a gallon in the Midwestern United States, America's love affair with the automobile may be headed toward a break-up. But before we ditch our wheels, we should first demand the government get rid of policies helping to drive up fuel prices. Our biggest roadblock to reforming gas prices is Bill Clinton. Although he says he understands the needs of poor and minority citizens, his energy and regulatory policies hurt us more than any other segment of the population. And he has fought hard to protect these hurtful programs from attempts to ...
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Bio-Foods Can Improve Nutrition in America, Cut Starvation and Disease in Africa, by John Meredith

New Visions Commentary /
Wouldn't you rather eat a banana than get a shot? I know that I would. Science now makes it possible to get a vaccination against hepatitis, which kills an estimated 100 million people per year worldwide, simply by eating a banana. A breakthrough in the field of biotechnology, it virtually eliminates the storage and sterilization concerns previously necessary for injections. It also saves money, costing just two cents for a banana instead of $125 for a shot! But this and other marvels of genetic-modification are at risk. Environmentalists are attacking biotechnology, trying to convince the government and the public that ...
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Needed: Environmental Justice for Minorities, by John Carlisle

New Visions Commentary /
A New Visions Commentary paper published June 2000 by The National Center for Public Policy Research, 501 Capitol Ct., N.E., Washington, DC 20002, 202/543-4110, Fax 202-543-5975, E-Mail [email protected], Web http://www.nationalcenter.org. Reprints permitted provided source is credited. "Be it required that there be a finding that a proposed federal environmental policy, program or regulation not have a disparate economic impact on minority populations and low-income populations before implementation." So should read one of the first Executive Orders the next president should issue upon taking office in 2001. This Executive Order is needed since African-Americans bear a disproportionate share of supporting the ...
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Bill Clinton’s Foreign Policy Double Standard, by Kevin Martin

New Visions Commentary /
In one corner, the long dead are reburied with full honors. In another corner, a young boy with no hands walks down a dusty road towards government-held positions - fleeing rebels closing in on the capital. Yet another corner has government troops launching SCUD-B missiles at rebel-held positions. In the last corner, two MIG fighters scream towards a school and drop their bombs, killing some 30 children inside. Is this Iraq, Bosnia, Kosovo, Chechnya or East Timor? No, this is just another day in Africa. The honored dead are Rwandan, the boy is in Sierra Leone, the SCUDs are being ...
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Media’s Selective Indignation Molds Moral Conscience, by Murdock “Doc” Gibbs

New Visions Commentary /
We were shocked when a black immigrant in New York City was shot at by police over 40 times while simply reaching for his wallet. We were appalled by the merciless and brutal beating of Rodney King in Los Angeles. We were horrified when two teens gunned down classmates and a teacher at Columbine High School in Colorado. Why? Ultimately, it was because the media led us to our anger. They told us to be outraged. The media regarded these events as "fret-worthy." And we responded. The media tells us what should shock, appall and horrify us. The way they ...
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Promoting Academic Achievement and Safe Schools, by Rita Thompson

New Visions Commentary /
As an African-American and the proud daughter of a woman who was a leader in the New York civil rights movement during the 1960s and 1970s, I am very sensitive to the issue of discrimination. However, I disagree with the Reverend Jesse Jackson's knee-jerk reaction to events in Decatur, Illinois. Officials there applied a zero-tolerance policy against school violence, where seven black students were expelled for engaging in mob violence last year. A wiser move for the Reverend Jackson would have been to inquire if the expelled students were receiving a high-quality education. A direct correlation exists between the quality ...
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Slavery in Our Time, by Kimberley Jane Wilson

New Visions Commentary /
A New Visions Commentary paper published May 2000 by The National Center for Public Policy Research, 501 Capitol Ct., N.E., Washington, DC 20002, 202/543-4110, Fax 202-543-5975, E-Mail [email protected], Web http://www.nationalcenter.org. Reprints permitted provided source is credited. If you went to public school any time in the last 20 years, you can be forgiven if you think slavery is a uniquely American and Southern experience. That belief, fueled by the political correctness movement, is dead wrong. The evil system we call slavery existed long before the United States was ever thought of, and occurred everywhere in the world. The ancient Greeks ...
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Marching Moms Laws Won’t Protect My House, by Richard Fair

New Visions Commentary /
I'm sitting here, chillin' on the couch. I'm not paying much attention to the news on TV, but the Million Mom March is getting all the pub today. I'm listening to what they have to say, and I wish the world could be like that. I wish the world was a perfect place; no gang violence, no innocent children dying, no need for guns. Million Mom Marchers wants stricter gun regulations. They believe it is going to stop children from getting killed in gun-related incidences. The more I think about all those issues, the more it makes me think about ...
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If They Were Right About That, What About…, by Eddie Huff

New Visions Commentary /
A New Visions Commentary paper published May 2000 by The National Center for Public Policy Research, 501 Capitol Ct., N.E., Washington, DC 20002, 202/543-4110, Fax 202-543-5975, E-Mail [email protected], Web http://www.nationalcenter.org. Reprints permitted provided source is credited. In light of reports that African-American and Latino unemployment is at an all-time low, I'd like to reflect on some things. In 1994, when the Republicans took control of Congress for the first time in decades, I wrote a commentary for the Oklahoma Eagle newspaper in Tulsa entitled, "Time To Put Up Or Shut Up for Republicans." I suggested that if the noise Republicans ...
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Conspiracy Can’t Condone Cop-Killing, by Michael King

New Visions Commentary /
A New Visions Commentary paper published May 2000 by The National Center for Public Policy Research, 501 Capitol Ct., N.E., Washington, DC 20002, 202/543-4110, Fax 202-543-5975, E-Mail [email protected], Web http://www.nationalcenter.org. Reprints permitted provided source is credited. Controversy is running rampant in Atlanta's black community and elsewhere, but I can't understand why. Jamil Al-Amin has been charged with the murder of Fulton County Deputy Ricky Kinchen. Deputy Kinchen, along with Deputy Aldranon English - both officers, by the way, are black - were shot as they tried to serve a warrant on Al-Amin for theft and impersonating an officer in mid-March ...
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Government Doesn’t Understand True Environmental Justice, by John Meredith

New Visions Commentary /
Have you ever been the victim of environmental racism? You probably have and not even known it. And, more than likely, it was the government that discriminated against you. If you ask someone from a liberal environmental group like Greenpeace or the Sierra Club to define environmental racism, they'll say it is when a big business comes into a poor or minority area and takes advantage of the community because it has more political clout than the residents. An example might be that a garbage dump was intentionally placed in a majority-black neighborhood simply because the people who lived there ...
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The Elian Snatch and What It Could Mean to You, by Kimberley Jane Wilson

New Visions Commentary /
By now, the Elian Gonzalez saga is all over but for the shouting. I suspect that Elian will soon be headed to Havana to sit on Fidel Castro's knee. Perhaps then he'll be allowed to live a normal Cuban child's life. That, by the way, means being taken from his father at the age of 11 to work in the sugar cane fields until he's 18. Frankly, I wish that Fidel Castro would've sent someone to pick up the boy back in November before this whole thing mutated into a made-for-television miniseries. However, what's done is done, and the custody ...
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Al Gore’s Dilemma, by Eddie Huff

New Visions Commentary /
A New Visions Commentary paper published April 2000 by The National Center for Public Policy Research, 501 Capitol Ct., N.E., Washington, DC 20002, 202/543-4110, Fax 202-543-5975, E-Mail [email protected], Web http://www.nationalcenter.org. Reprints permitted provided source is credited. With the "Super Tuesday" primaries clearing the road ahead to the real super Tuesday in November, the battle lines between Al Gore and George W. Bush are feverishly being drawn. Strategists are huddling to work out how each man can win the minds and souls of the voting public. At this early juncture, handicappers would have to give the edge to Vice President Gore ...
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The Cider House Lies, by Robert George

New Visions Commentary /
A New Visions Commentary paper published April 2000 by The National Center for Public Policy Research, 501 Capitol Ct., N.E., Washington, DC 20002, 202/543-4110, Fax 202-543-5975, E-Mail [email protected], Web http://www.nationalcenter.org. Reprints permitted provided source is credited. I rarely get agitated at works of art. But The Cider House Rules movie is a notable exception. Its wretchedness was only enhanced by author John Irving's self-serving speech accepting the Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay at the recent Academy Awards. That there hasn't been more anger speaks to the selectivity of political outrage. In the movie, Homer Wells (Tobey Maguire) has been raised ...
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The “Digital Divide” is a Voluntary Gap, by Mike Green

New Visions Commentary /
A New Visions Commentary paper published April 2000 by The National Center for Public Policy Research, 501 Capitol Ct., N.E., Washington, DC 20002, 202/543-4110, Fax 202-543-5975, E-Mail [email protected], Web http://www.nationalcenter.org. Reprints permitted provided source is credited. The information age is here. Computers bring an exciting new frontier for research, commerce and educational opportunity. It also brings a new angle on victimization. It's called the "digital divide." It assumes that millions of poor and black Americans are left behind while others enjoy the opportunities brought by the Internet. Never missing an opportunity to expand the role - and subsequent control - ...
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Selected Project 21 Media Appearances

Project 21

Opportunity to Join

Help promote the diversity of opinion in black American community. Make the 21st century a time when character transcends race, and where open and honest debate flourishes.

Please complete this form to begin the process of becoming a member of the Project 21 black leadership network.

By clicking here, I agree to serve as a member of the Advisory Board of Project 21 - a program of the National Center for Public Policy Research. I understand membership does not imply agreement with all statements and views of all Project 21 members or the organization. I understand membership does not imply I am accepting any financial or other responsibility related to the success of Project 21 or the National Center. I understand that the National Center is a 501(c)(3) organization that does not seek to influence opinions on candidates or political parties, and I will abide by this rule as a member of the Project 21 Advisory Board. As Project 21 exists to examine new approaches and ideas and promote discussion of them, all participants in its programs - including formal publications and media appearances - must, of necessity, speak at all times on their own behalf. No endorsement by members of the Project 21 Advisory Council, other program participants or the National Center for Public Policy Research is implied.

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The National Center for Public Policy Research is a communications and research foundation supportive of a strong national defense and dedicated to providing free market solutions to today’s public policy problems. We believe that the principles of a free market, individual liberty and personal responsibility provide the greatest hope for meeting the challenges facing America in the 21st century.