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LATEST NEWS FROM PROJECT 21

COVID-19 Prisoner Release Schemes are Utter Nonsense, by Stacy Washington

COVID-19 Prisoner Release Schemes are Utter Nonsense, by Stacy Washington

New Visions Commentary /
When California governor Gavin Newsom pointedly notes the political opportunity provided by the pandemic, we should stop, look up and listen. At a virtual press conference April ...
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Conning the Public to Release Prisoners During the Pandemic

Conning the Public to Release Prisoners During the Pandemic

ConservativeBlog.org /
In fighting the “invisible war” against the spread of the coronavirus, we should not “handicap ourselves by bringing in additional combatants,” advises Project 21 Co-Chairman Stacy ...
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How a Grandmother’s Wisdom Can Counter the Left’s Agenda

How a Grandmother’s Wisdom Can Counter the Left’s Agenda

ConservativeBlog.org /
Former Trump Administration advisor and current talk show host Sebastian Gorka has declared that Project 21 Co-Chairman Horace Cooper will now be a regular guest ...
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Blueprint for a Better Deal for Black America

About Project 21

Project 21 is an initiative of The National Center for Public Policy Research to promote the views of African-Americans whose entrepreneurial spirit, dedication to family and commitment to individual responsibility have not traditionally been echoed by the nation’s civil rights establishment.

Project 21 participants have been interviewed by hundreds of media outlets, including the O’Reilly Factor, Hannity and Colmes, the CNN Morning News, Black Entertainment Television’s Lead Story, America’s Black Forum, the McLaughlin Group, C-SPAN’s Morning Journal and the Rush Limbaugh, Michael Reagan, Sean Hannity, G. Gordon Liddy and Larry King shows, as well as in newspapers such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, The Washington Times and many others.

Project 21 participants live all over the U.S. and have a variety of careers. What they have in common is a desire to make America a better place for African-Americans, and all Americans, to live and work. Project 21 members do this in a variety of ways in their own communities, and, through Project 21, by writing opinion editorials for newspapers, participating in public policy discussions on radio and television, by participating in policy panels, by giving speeches before student, business and community groups, and by advising policymakers at the national, state and local levels.

Project 21: A History

Project 21 is an initiative of The National Center for Public Policy Research to promote the views of African-Americans whose entrepreneurial spirit, sense of family and commitment to individual responsibility have not traditionally been echoed by the nation’s civil rights establishment. This became most obvious during the April 1992 riots in Los Angeles, when the media provided extended coverage of the reaction of liberal civil rights leaders to the events surrounding the Rodney King controversy. Curiously, the media made little mention of those in the African-American community who spoke out in favor of law and order and individual responsibility – and against the rioting.

Rather than merely complain about the lack of attention given to conservative and moderate African-Americans as typified by the coverage of the riots, The National Center for Public Policy Research convened a meeting of conservative and moderate African-American activists in mid-1992 to determine whether it was feasible to construct a network to bring conservative and moderate voices in the black community to the attention of the media. The answer was yes, and Project 21 was born. By March of 1993, Project 21 secured the necessary funding to hire a full-time coordinator to pursue its goals. Project 21’s mission includes the active promotion of conservative and moderate viewpoints by Project 21’s network of members in the media, and the ongoing recruitment of new members to be promoted.

Project 21 acts as a public relations network for moderate and conservative African-Americans, and is interested in promoting those African-Americans who want to discuss their beliefs not only in the privacy of their own homes but in thousands, sometimes millions, of homes across America. Whether a member is a talented writer, articulate speaker, dedicated policy analyst or just have interesting viewpoints on important issues, Project 21 is there to help its members get recognition.

Project 21 has enjoyed enormous success. Project 21’s network of African-American moderates and conservatives have been interviewed by hundreds of newspapers, talk radio shows and television programs throughout the country. Participants have been featured on such programs as CNN & Company, CNN Morning News, The McLaughlin Group, C-SPAN’s Morning Journal, Larry King, Rush Limbaugh, The Michael Reagan Show, BET’s Our Voices, and America’s Black Forum as well as in newspapers such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, The Washington Times, The Detroit News, USA Today, The Cleveland Plain-Dealer, and many others.

Project 21 members have been published, quoted or interviewed over 35,000 times since the program was launched in 1992.

Project 21 first burst into attention following the release of Black America 1994: Changing Direction in January 1994. A 77-page volume, Black America 1994 is a comprehensive assessment of the challenges and opportunities facing the African-American community. A collection of 15 essays written by Project 21 participants, the report addressed important contemporary issues including economic stagnation, crime, education, health, welfare, and the disintegration of the black family.

In the weeks following the report’s release, its contributors participated in several hundred media interviews, and Project 21 received nearly 5,000 requests for information and numerous offers of support.

Project 21 released a major report, The Health Care Ghetto: African-Americans and Health Care Reform, at a National Press Club press conference in August, 1994. The report was the first of its kind to analyze how various health care reform initiatives would affect minority communities.

In January 1995, Project 21 released a second annual report: Black America 1995: A New Beginning. The report consisted of 38 essays by Project 21 members on topics ranging from the information superhighway to crime. In January 1996, a series of profiles were released of black conservatives and moderates who shun government spending and embrace greater community involvement as the way to solve problems. Black America 1996: A Time for Renewal also included an agenda created by black conservatives and moderates outlining what government needs to do – and what it needs to stop doing – if people are going to start solving their own problems.

In 1997, following two years of research, Project 21 released an in-depth report: Black America 1997: How Government Harms Charities… And How Some are Succeeding Anyway. Until now, it has not been widely known that humanitarian groups suffer from government’s regulatory harassment. The 90-page report received front page newspaper coverage in Washington D.C. and led to calls from lawmakers interested in repealing the regulations that harm the ability of charities to help the poor.

Project 21 also has taken a lead role in bringing to public attention the fact that a substantial number of government environmental rules have a disproportionately negative economic impact on minorities. In addition to assisting with the research and publication of over 60 studies, op-eds and press releases on this topic in recent years, in 2002, joining with the John P. McGovern Center for Environmental and Regulatory Affairs to form a Center for Environmental Justice, Project 21 released a comprehensive econometric analysis of the impact of so-called “smart growth” regulations on minorities. The study, “Smart Growth and Its Effects on Housing Markets: The New Segregation” was published in November, 2002.

Project 21 is also actively involved in educating the public on proposals to empower communities rather than the government. For instance, Project 21 was instrumental in promoting the ideas incorporated in the Community Renewal Act, sponsored by Reps. Jim Talent (R-MO) and J.C. Watts (R-OK) in the 105th Congress. Project 21’s Contract with Black America, proposed to the leadership of the Republican Congress in January 1995, started the process that eventually led to the crafting of the Community Renewal Act.

Press Releases

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New Visions Commentary

NAACP Not Ready for Prime Time, by Deroy Murdock

New Visions Commentary /
A New Visions Commentary paper published February 2000 by The National Center for Public Policy Research, 501 Capitol Court, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20002, 202/543-4110, Fax 202/543-5975, E-Mail [email protected], Web http://www.nationalcenter.org. Reprints permitted provided source is credited. The NAACP seems more interested in fictional black characters than real black people. Kweisi Mfume, president of the Baltimore-based civil rights group, has generated headlines lately for pressuring the four TV networks to address what he calls a "virtual whitewash in programming." Last summer, Mfume threatened to boycott the networks "because none of the 26 new shows slated for the fall season have a ...
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Transcending Ideals About Trans-Racial Adoptions, by Tara Wall

New Visions Commentary /
A New Visions Commentary paper published February 2000 by The National Center for Public Policy Research, 501 Capitol Court, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20002, 202/543-4110, Fax 202/543-5975, E-Mail [email protected], Web http://www.nationalcenter.org. Reprints permitted provided source is credited. Imagine yourself as a child without a home, parents, siblings or anything to call your own. Think of the torment and feelings of despair of not being wanted and unloved. Then one day a caring, loving couple comes along that wants to envelop you in their arms, give you the home you never had and provide the opportunity for you to become all that ...
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Margaret Sanger is No Hero to Black America, by Mike Green

New Visions Commentary /
NBC's Today show recently brought tears to my eyes. In disbelief, I watched our nation's mainstream media honor Margaret Sanger, the woman who single-handedly gave birth to Planned Parenthood and the abortion movement. The movement that is responsible for literally millions of terminated souls, including more than 1,200 abortions of African-American children each day! As Katie Couric heralded this bigoted, racist woman as a heroine for the millennium, my jaw hit the floor. Sanger was described as vivacious, warm, healing and powerfully driven. Ellen Chesler, a Sanger biographer, said Sanger wanted simply to liberate "women to experience their sexuality free ...
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Donna Brazile and the Politics of Personal Destruction, by Kevin Martin

New Visions Commentary /
Donna Brazile, Al Gore's presidential campaign manager, recently sought to breathe new life into the foundering campaign by playing the race card. She attacked top black Republicans Congressman J.C. Watts and retired General Colin Powell, charging that they and their party have no programs to feed poor children and would rather take pictures with them than feed them. Both Watts and Powell fired off angry letters to Gore, who defended Brazile's actions. Later, however, Gore sought to smooth things over with a telephone call to Powell to say he had nothing but respect for Powell and his work with American ...
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The Next Civil Rights Battleground, by Steve Forbes

New Visions Commentary /
A New Visions Commentary paper published January 2000 by The National Center for Public Policy Research, 501 Capitol Court, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20002, 202/543-4110, Fax 202/543-5975, E-Mail [email protected], Web http://www.nationalcenter.org. Reprints permitted provided source is credited. Americans recently paused to reflect on the legacy of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. It is fitting that we did so because he led a dramatic civil rights revolution by asking if America still abided by her founding creed that we are all created equal and have the right to live free and develop to the fullest our God-given talents. King refused to ...
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Send Elian Home, by Michael King

New Visions Commentary /
A New Visions Commentary paper published January 2000 by The National Center for Public Policy Research, 501 Capitol Court, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20002, 202/543-4110, Fax 202/543-5975, E-Mail [email protected], Web http://www.nationalcenter.org. Reprints permitted provided source is credited. Elian Gonzalez's parents were divorced, much the same way that thousands of couples have separated and divorced in the United States. Elian and his brother were in the custody of his father, Juan, with his mother taking him on weekends; again, much the same way as many couples in the United States. What's different is that Elizabet Broton Rodriguez then undertook a journey across ...
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GOP Boyz in the ‘Hood? by Robert George

New Visions Commentary /
A New Visions Commentary paper published January 2000 by The National Center for Public Policy Research. Reprints permitted provided source is credited. For the first time in decades, issues of vital interest to the African-American community are actually being debated in the Republican presidential primary campaign. This won't change the fact that 90-plus percent of the black vote is Democratic - not right away, anyway. But in the long run, it may do something about the Republicans' ineptness (at best) in crafting a message for and campaigning in minority communities. During a New York visit a few weeks ago, Texas ...
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Feminists Fight Congressional Support for Good Dads, by Jesse Lee Peterson

New Visions Commentary /
When I look back and see what has happened to the black family and community as a whole because of the absence of good fathers, I shudder to think of the destruction to come. I believe that, if this issue is not dealt with honestly, we will someday have disorder that will be beyond our capability to control. In my ministering, I come in contact with many young men who are contemptuous of their fathers. Having been left by their fathers and living in an environment where they see only weak men like drug addicts, unemployed men and men not ...
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Bill Bradley Fouls the Civil Rights Act, by R.D. Davis

New Visions Commentary /
Former basketball star and current Democratic presidential candidate Bill Bradley hasn't fouled an opponent on the basketball court in years, but lately he's fouling the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Bradley claims the congressional vote on the Act led to which political party he would join. Oh, really? On October 9, 1999 at an Iowa Jefferson-Jackson Day Dinner, Bradley exclaimed: "I remember the exact moment that I became a Democrat. It was the summer of 1964; I was an intern in Washington between my junior and senior year in college. And I was in the Senate chamber the night the ...
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Privacy and Prejudice, by Michael King

New Visions Commentary /
A New Visions Commentary paper published December 1999 by The National Center for Public Policy Research, 501 Capitol Court, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20002, 202/543-4110, Fax 202/543-5975, E-Mail [email protected], Web http://www.nationalcenter.org. Reprints permitted provided source is credited. When you think that you've heard everything, something else shows up on the table to go one better. Atlanta Mayor Bill Campbell is upset with local media for breaking a story involving the Atlanta Police Department (APD) that hits him rather close to home. There is a police car that always sits near the mayor's residence on Atlanta's East Side. This isn't unusual - ...
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Keeping Kids Safe on the Internet, by Tara Wall

New Visions Commentary /
A New Visions Commentary paper published December 1999 by The National Center for Public Policy Research, 501 Capitol Court, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20002, 202/543-4110, Fax 202/543-5975, E-Mail [email protected], Web http://www.nationalcenter.org. Reprints permitted provided source is credited. How safe are our children when they are surfing the Internet? There is no denying the incredible educational advantages the Internet offers and how essential mastering it is to future success in the professional world, but there are also dangers waiting for the innocent and unsuspecting. For the many computerless African-Americans households on the wrong side of the "digital divide," it is more important ...
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Can You Go Home Again? by E. LeMay Lathan

New Visions Commentary /
I've always heard "you can never go home again." Up until now, I assumed it meant changes would make your old home unrecognizable. That's what I thought until I recently made my own pilgrimage back home to Jackson, Mississippi. My five brothers and I made a surprise visit to my parents' new retirement home in Florence, Alabama. The surprise family reunion was fantastic. My Dad enjoyed our company and my Mom cooked and cooked and cooked (and we ate as usual). A great time was had by all. That is, until my Mom and I made the trip back to ...
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Blacks Need a Hate-Your-Own-Race Crime Bill, by R.D. Davis

New Visions Commentary /
A New Visions Commentary paper published November 1999 by The National Center for Public Policy Research, 501 Capitol Ct., N.E., Washington, DC 20002, 202/543-4110, Fax 202-543-5975, E-Mail [email protected], Web http://www.nationalcenter.org. Reprints permitted provided source is credited. Have you ever wondered why, when blacks commit crimes like murder or rape against other blacks, they will only go to prison for about two seconds before they are back on the street again? How about when blacks (other than O.J.) victimize whites? They seem to always go to prison for two lifetimes. Why the discrepancy? Well, I think I have the answer. Are ...
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True Mediation, Not Intimidation, Needed in Decatur, by Michael King

New Visions Commentary /
A New Visions Commentary paper published November 1999 by The National Center for Public Policy Research, 501 Capitol Ct., N.E., Washington, DC 20002, 202/543-4110, Fax 202-543-5975, E-Mail [email protected], Web http://www.nationalcenter.org. Reprints permitted provided source is credited. The Reverend Jesse Jackson has stepped forward yet again to mediate a situation. This time, it is in a local school district in Illinois. But has he gone too far in his criticism of an excessive punishment by advocating no punishment at all? In the city of Decatur, seven black students from Eisenhower High School were involved in a September 17 fistfight at a ...
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Setting the Struggle Back, by Michael King

New Visions Commentary /
A New Visions Commentary paper published October 1999 by The National Center for Public Policy Research, 501 Capitol Ct., N.E., Washington, DC 20002, 202/543-4110, Fax 202-543-5975, E-Mail [email protected], Web http://www.nationalcenter.org. Reprints permitted provided source is credited. The unthinkable has happened in Georgia. A duo of so-called civil rights leaders say blacks should serve on juries, but not to provide justice. Instead, they should make certain that black defendants go free even though they may be guilty. Georgia state Representative Tyrone Brooks, president of the Georgia Association of Black Elected Officials, and Joe Beasley, the Georgia chair of the Rainbow Coalition, ...
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Al Gor(e)ing Blacks Again, by R.D. Davis

New Visions Commentary /
A New Visions Commentary paper published October 1999 by The National Center for Public Policy Research, 501 Capitol Ct., N.E., Washington, DC 20002, 202/543-4110, Fax 202-543-5975, E-Mail [email protected], Web http://www.nationalcenter.org. Reprints permitted provided source is credited. Al Gore is continuing the Democrats' brainwashing of blacks for their votes. National Review magazine reported that Vice President Gore recently told the NAACP in a speech that his father, the late Tennessee Senator Albert Gore, Sr., lost his re-election bid in 1970 because he supported civil rights legislation. His black audience believed him. The Sacramento Bee reported Vice President Gore, while addressing the ...
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Major Payne, Mrs. Tingle and the ACLU, by Mike Ramey

New Visions Commentary /
If one believes the claims of the education establishment, the single biggest threat to America's schools is not low test scores, overcrowded classrooms, the marked ejection of evolution as a valid educational curriculum or the lack of school vouchers. The education establishment thinks its biggest threat is the way Hollywood portrays it in films. Case in point: the outcry by factions of the National Education Association this past summer over the movie "Teaching Mrs. Tingle." In a nutshell, the movie is about three high school students who kidnap a sadistic, flunk-happy history teacher - Mrs. Tingle - to cover for ...
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A Loss of a Friend and Leader, by Colorado Lt. Governor Joe Rogers

New Visions Commentary /
I have lost a good friend and Colorado has lost a leader. Vikki Buckley, Colorado's Secretary of State, died on July 14, 1999 at the very young age of 50 due to heart failure. Vikki was a role model, mentor and friend to my entire family. She worked hard to be the best she could be and give the best of herself to the people. A native of Denver, Vikki was the product of public schools and hard work. She proved the American Dream could still be achieved. Once a young, struggling mother who, for a time, received welfare assistance, ...
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Junior High and High Schoolers: Think About Your Future! by E. LeMay Lathan

New Visions Commentary /
As another school year begins and thoughts of skipping class and missing lessons dance in your minds, think of the consequences. You are no longer little kids being sent off to the cruel confines of school by your parents. You are now young men and women preparing for your futures. Make no mistake about it - the burden of learning falls squarely on your shoulders. Sure, you can claim your parents are mean and rotten, that they pay no attention to you, that your neighborhood and community are forsaken by businesses and there is an absence of positive role models, ...
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Let’s Put Some Spirit into Government Aid, by Star Parker

New Visions Commentary /
Vice President Al Gore now says he thinks churches and faith-based organizations should partner with government to do charity work, but only if they leave out their spiritual component when they do so. Speaking from personal experience as a former welfare mother, I think Gore made a big mistake when he added that "but only if." Letting private religious charities administer welfare services is a common sense approach to the transition from welfare to independence. But the charities need to be allowed to offer their clients spiritual support. The first step welfare mothers must take if they are to mainstream ...
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Selected Project 21 Media Appearances

Project 21

Opportunity to Join

Help promote the diversity of opinion in black American community. Make the 21st century a time when character transcends race, and where open and honest debate flourishes.

Please complete this form to begin the process of becoming a member of the Project 21 black leadership network.

By clicking here, I agree to serve as a member of the Advisory Board of Project 21 - a program of the National Center for Public Policy Research. I understand membership does not imply agreement with all statements and views of all Project 21 members or the organization. I understand membership does not imply I am accepting any financial or other responsibility related to the success of Project 21 or the National Center. I understand that the National Center is a 501(c)(3) organization that does not seek to influence opinions on candidates or political parties, and I will abide by this rule as a member of the Project 21 Advisory Board. As Project 21 exists to examine new approaches and ideas and promote discussion of them, all participants in its programs - including formal publications and media appearances - must, of necessity, speak at all times on their own behalf. No endorsement by members of the Project 21 Advisory Council, other program participants or the National Center for Public Policy Research is implied.

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The National Center for Public Policy Research is a communications and research foundation supportive of a strong national defense and dedicated to providing free market solutions to today’s public policy problems. We believe that the principles of a free market, individual liberty and personal responsibility provide the greatest hope for meeting the challenges facing America in the 21st century.