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LATEST NEWS FROM PROJECT 21

Even RBG Understands Need to Limit Racial Lawsuits

Even RBG Understands Need to Limit Racial Lawsuits

ConservativeBlog.org /
One America News correspondent Stefan Kleinhenz recently reported that “a monumental Supreme Court ruling seemingly got left out of major headlines amid ongoing coverage of ...
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Surgeon General’s Coronavirus Advice Helpful, Not Hateful

Surgeon General’s Coronavirus Advice Helpful, Not Hateful

ConservativeBlog.org /
Is the surgeon general tone-deaf about minorities? At a recent White House coronavirus press conference, he was questioned by a PBS correspondent who suggested that ...
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Coronavirus Update from the Big Easy

Coronavirus Update from the Big Easy

ConservativeBlog.org /
Working under the motto of “share supply and create safety,” Project 21 member Nadra Enzi is a “safety creator” and community activist in New Orleans ...
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Blueprint for a Better Deal for Black America

About Project 21

Project 21 is an initiative of The National Center for Public Policy Research to promote the views of African-Americans whose entrepreneurial spirit, dedication to family and commitment to individual responsibility have not traditionally been echoed by the nation’s civil rights establishment.

Project 21 participants have been interviewed by hundreds of media outlets, including the O’Reilly Factor, Hannity and Colmes, the CNN Morning News, Black Entertainment Television’s Lead Story, America’s Black Forum, the McLaughlin Group, C-SPAN’s Morning Journal and the Rush Limbaugh, Michael Reagan, Sean Hannity, G. Gordon Liddy and Larry King shows, as well as in newspapers such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, The Washington Times and many others.

Project 21 participants live all over the U.S. and have a variety of careers. What they have in common is a desire to make America a better place for African-Americans, and all Americans, to live and work. Project 21 members do this in a variety of ways in their own communities, and, through Project 21, by writing opinion editorials for newspapers, participating in public policy discussions on radio and television, by participating in policy panels, by giving speeches before student, business and community groups, and by advising policymakers at the national, state and local levels.

Project 21: A History

Project 21 is an initiative of The National Center for Public Policy Research to promote the views of African-Americans whose entrepreneurial spirit, sense of family and commitment to individual responsibility have not traditionally been echoed by the nation’s civil rights establishment. This became most obvious during the April 1992 riots in Los Angeles, when the media provided extended coverage of the reaction of liberal civil rights leaders to the events surrounding the Rodney King controversy. Curiously, the media made little mention of those in the African-American community who spoke out in favor of law and order and individual responsibility – and against the rioting.

Rather than merely complain about the lack of attention given to conservative and moderate African-Americans as typified by the coverage of the riots, The National Center for Public Policy Research convened a meeting of conservative and moderate African-American activists in mid-1992 to determine whether it was feasible to construct a network to bring conservative and moderate voices in the black community to the attention of the media. The answer was yes, and Project 21 was born. By March of 1993, Project 21 secured the necessary funding to hire a full-time coordinator to pursue its goals. Project 21’s mission includes the active promotion of conservative and moderate viewpoints by Project 21’s network of members in the media, and the ongoing recruitment of new members to be promoted.

Project 21 acts as a public relations network for moderate and conservative African-Americans, and is interested in promoting those African-Americans who want to discuss their beliefs not only in the privacy of their own homes but in thousands, sometimes millions, of homes across America. Whether a member is a talented writer, articulate speaker, dedicated policy analyst or just have interesting viewpoints on important issues, Project 21 is there to help its members get recognition.

Project 21 has enjoyed enormous success. Project 21’s network of African-American moderates and conservatives have been interviewed by hundreds of newspapers, talk radio shows and television programs throughout the country. Participants have been featured on such programs as CNN & Company, CNN Morning News, The McLaughlin Group, C-SPAN’s Morning Journal, Larry King, Rush Limbaugh, The Michael Reagan Show, BET’s Our Voices, and America’s Black Forum as well as in newspapers such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, The Washington Times, The Detroit News, USA Today, The Cleveland Plain-Dealer, and many others.

Project 21 members have been published, quoted or interviewed over 35,000 times since the program was launched in 1992.

Project 21 first burst into attention following the release of Black America 1994: Changing Direction in January 1994. A 77-page volume, Black America 1994 is a comprehensive assessment of the challenges and opportunities facing the African-American community. A collection of 15 essays written by Project 21 participants, the report addressed important contemporary issues including economic stagnation, crime, education, health, welfare, and the disintegration of the black family.

In the weeks following the report’s release, its contributors participated in several hundred media interviews, and Project 21 received nearly 5,000 requests for information and numerous offers of support.

Project 21 released a major report, The Health Care Ghetto: African-Americans and Health Care Reform, at a National Press Club press conference in August, 1994. The report was the first of its kind to analyze how various health care reform initiatives would affect minority communities.

In January 1995, Project 21 released a second annual report: Black America 1995: A New Beginning. The report consisted of 38 essays by Project 21 members on topics ranging from the information superhighway to crime. In January 1996, a series of profiles were released of black conservatives and moderates who shun government spending and embrace greater community involvement as the way to solve problems. Black America 1996: A Time for Renewal also included an agenda created by black conservatives and moderates outlining what government needs to do – and what it needs to stop doing – if people are going to start solving their own problems.

In 1997, following two years of research, Project 21 released an in-depth report: Black America 1997: How Government Harms Charities… And How Some are Succeeding Anyway. Until now, it has not been widely known that humanitarian groups suffer from government’s regulatory harassment. The 90-page report received front page newspaper coverage in Washington D.C. and led to calls from lawmakers interested in repealing the regulations that harm the ability of charities to help the poor.

Project 21 also has taken a lead role in bringing to public attention the fact that a substantial number of government environmental rules have a disproportionately negative economic impact on minorities. In addition to assisting with the research and publication of over 60 studies, op-eds and press releases on this topic in recent years, in 2002, joining with the John P. McGovern Center for Environmental and Regulatory Affairs to form a Center for Environmental Justice, Project 21 released a comprehensive econometric analysis of the impact of so-called “smart growth” regulations on minorities. The study, “Smart Growth and Its Effects on Housing Markets: The New Segregation” was published in November, 2002.

Project 21 is also actively involved in educating the public on proposals to empower communities rather than the government. For instance, Project 21 was instrumental in promoting the ideas incorporated in the Community Renewal Act, sponsored by Reps. Jim Talent (R-MO) and J.C. Watts (R-OK) in the 105th Congress. Project 21’s Contract with Black America, proposed to the leadership of the Republican Congress in January 1995, started the process that eventually led to the crafting of the Community Renewal Act.

Press Releases

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New Visions Commentary

Violence in America, by Mike Green

New Visions Commentary /
A New Visions Commentary paper published September 1999 by The National Center for Public Policy Research, 501 Capitol Ct., N.E., Washington, DC 20002, 202/543-4110, Fax 202-543-5975, E-Mail [email protected], Web http://www.nationalcenter.org. Reprints permitted provided source is credited. Every day, we live comfortably with the notion that we are safe and secure. We don't think of violence as a way of life, but simply something on television programs and in the news. That notion is pure fantasy. America has a domestic violence problem. Every single day, hundreds of thousands of people across the country endure physical abuse in their own homes. Police ...
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Come to the Table, Don’t “Battle to the Death”, by Michael King

New Visions Commentary /
A New Visions Commentary paper published September 1999 by The National Center for Public Policy Research, 501 Capitol Ct., N.E., Washington, DC 20002, 202/543-4110, Fax 202-543-5975, E-Mail [email protected], Web http://www.nationalcenter.org. Reprints permitted provided source is credited. Atlanta, the Metropolis of the South, has a problem. If not rectified soon, it will lead to a fight of the type not seen since the height of the Civil Rights Movement. This past summer, most of America saw a remorseful Atlanta Mayor Bill Campbell discuss the shooting rampage of day-trader Mark Barton on worldwide television. A quiet and reserved Campbell sang the praises ...
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Rudy Giuliani’s Crime-Fighting Policies Save Black Lives, by Deroy Murdock

New Visions Commentary /
That question fuels an inflammatory new song by a rap band called Screwball. It graphically depicts the assassination of New York mayor Rudy Giuliani. The song begins, "A yo who shot Rudy in broad daylight for cash." Its barely-punctuated lyrics continue: "I woke up this morning and heard the news flash. They said it happened down at city hall he had his wife with him five shots from the crowd made him fall it was chaos and pandemonium blood covered up the podium... when they announced his death wifey was stressed..." The song then mentions "blacks smiling ear to ear." ...
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When Birth Control Could Lead to Race Control, by Jackie Cissell

New Visions Commentary /
Years ago, I was called an extremist when I spoke out about the 1930s-era "Negro Project." Now, a dangerous new study entitled "Legalized Abortion and Crime" has African-Americans in shock because it could threaten the very survival of the race. Who's extreme now? In the study, economist Steven D. Levitt of the University of Chicago and Stanford Law School Professor John J. Donohue III conclude that legalized abortion might explain why America experienced an overall reduction in crime from 1991 to 1997. This study is so dangerous it is hard to know where to begin. But let me start with ...
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On the NAACP and Boycotts, by Kimberley Jane Wilson

New Visions Commentary /
A New Visions Commentary paper published August 1999 by The National Center for Public Policy Research, 501 Capitol Ct., N.E., Washington, DC 20002, 202/543-4110, Fax 202-543-5975, E-Mail [email protected], Web http://www.nationalcenter.org. Reprints permitted provided source is credited. A few years ago, I paid a visit to my grandfather. At first, he didn't recognize me. Alzheimer's Disease had robbed him of his memory. After a bit of gentle coaxing, he had a sudden but pitifully brief breakthrough. While he still couldn't recall my father - his first-born son - he did remember me as a baby. I reintroduced him to my husband ...
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KKKapitol Hill? by Eddie Huff

New Visions Commentary /
A New Visions Commentary paper published August 1999 by The National Center for Public Policy Research, 501 Capitol Ct., N.E., Washington, DC 20002, 202/543-4110, Fax 202-543-5975, E-Mail [email protected], Web http://www.nationalcenter.org. Reprints permitted provided source is credited. Racism is alive and thriving in the halls of Capitol Hill - at least that's the contention of one lawmaker. Representative Earl Hilliard, a black Democrat from Alabama, says his Democratic colleagues are guilty of "outright racism" because they employ relatively few blacks on their personal staffs or their congressional committees. Rep. James Clyburn (D-SC), chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus, agreed, saying, "the ...
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Abraham, Martin and Now John, Jr., by Star Parker

New Visions Commentary /
I haven't cried yet over the death of John Fitzgerald Kennedy, Jr. I guess one reason is because I didn't know anything about him. I just found out that he was the only son of the late, great President John F. Kennedy. I am sad though. I'm sad because I didn't know him. I didn't know how he felt about the vision his dad had for this country. I also didn't know if he had the desire, the passion or the anointing to continue that vision. This was a vision birthed during one of the most intense periods of America, ...
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Thou Shalt Not Scapegoat: Why Posting the Ten Commandments In Public Schools is Too Little, Too Late, by Emanuel McLittle

New Visions Commentary /
On June 17, Congress passed a bill allowing the Ten Commandments to be posted on walls of the nation's 85,000 public schools. After weeks of debate, it represents a feeble response to the abyss of school violence. I hoped for better from the Republican-led Congress. The emotional explosion of the Columbine massacre resulted in political fragments that the Clinton-led Left interpreted as an opportunity for more gun control. The Republicans were cornered into doing another one of those "somethings" that will do nothing to heal, or even honestly analyze, the "whys" of how we got here. What few conservatives and ...
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Black Involvement in the Forbes Campaign Good for the GOP and the U.S.A., by Niger Innis

New Visions Commentary /
A New Visions Commentary paper published July 1999 by The National Center for Public Policy Research, 501 Capitol Ct., N.E., Washington, DC 20002, 202/543-4110, Fax 202-543-5975, E-Mail [email protected], Web http://www.nationalcenter.org. Reprints permitted provided source is credited. I was recently struck by an event that I hope represents the future of the Republican Party in particular and America in general. I had the pleasure of attending the kick-off dinner of Steve Forbes' presidential campaign. While impressed by the enthusiasm of the approximately 1,200 supporters at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in Manhattan, the type of people attending surprised me that much more. As ...
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The Legal Dis-Service Corporation, by Stuart Pigler

New Visions Commentary /
A New Visions Commentary paper published July 1999 by The National Center for Public Policy Research, 501 Capitol Ct., N.E., Washington, DC 20002, 202/543-4110, Fax 202-543-5975, E-Mail [email protected], Web http://www.nationalcenter.org. Reprints permitted provided source is credited. Do you want a criminal living next door? Of course not. But if attorneys funded by the federal Legal Services Corporation (LSC) have their way, you may not be able to get rid of them. What's worse, your tax dollars are paying for LSC. And they claim they are working for your best interests. For example, Florida Rural Legal Services (FRLS), an LSC affiliate, ...
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Public School Violence: An Adult Problem, by Mike Green

New Visions Commentary /
A New Visions Commentary paper published June 1999 by The National Center for Public Policy Research, 501 Capitol Court, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20002, 202/543-4110, Fax 202/543-5975, E-Mail [email protected], Web http://www.nationalcenter.org. Reprints permitted provided source is credited. School violence in Colorado, Georgia and elsewhere has left us with a cold-hearted message. The blame for students' murderous tirades falls squarely upon our shoulders. As adults, shouldn't we be delving into the moral cavity of these boys and the immoral framework that makes up the environment we call public school? First of all, the violence inflicted on our children by other children is ...
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For Our Children’s Future, Replace Affirmative Action, by David Almasi

New Visions Commentary /
Affirmative action doesn't work. Mentoring, on the other hand, is proving to be a smashing success. It truly helps minorities in schools and the workplace without creating the hard feeling bred by quotas. I recently had the pleasure of meeting Norman McLean, the highest-ranking college administrator in England. In 1992, Mr. McLean began a mentoring program at the University of East London to help black students create relationships in the professional community, make career decisions and gain valuable work experience. The program was so productive that it became the National Mentoring Consortium (NMC) in 1994, and has expanded to top-rate ...
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Education, Education, Education, by E. LaMay Lathan

New Visions Commentary /
Education can change a life. Given its importance, why are so many black kids steering clear of it like the plague? We can't just blame the kids when teachers, schools, hardships, single-parent households and other things share responsibility. We've provided kids with plenty of ways not to get a good education. We've invented mental conditions like ADD and ADHD to allow them to avoid hard work and dedication, saying, "It's not your fault, you have a reason for not paying attention." In my day, however, it was called just plain DUMB. The problem is that we've gotten away from what ...
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Longing for Fathers, by Reverend Jesse Lee Peterson

New Visions Commentary /
A New Visions Commentary paper published June 1999 by The National Center for Public Policy Research, 501 Capitol Ct., N.E., Washington, DC 20002, 202/543-4110, Fax 202-543-5975, E-Mail [email protected],Web http://www.nationalcenter.org. Reprints permitted provided source is credited. I once spoke to approximately 57 young men at a youth detention center in Prattville, Alabama. The topic of discussion centered on fathers. Hardly any of these youngsters had a relationship with their own fathers. Some spoke of stepfathers. For most, their entire life experience had been spent under the influence of women, and this had totally consumed their spirit, mind and body. These young ...
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Blacks “Gored” By a Lie: Al Gore Sr., the GOP and the Civil Rights Act of 1964, by R.D. Davis

New Visions Commentary /
A New Visions Commentary paper published May 1999 by The National Center for Public Policy Research. Reprints permitted provided source is credited. It is easy to control the minds of a people. All one has to do is change history by lying about the past. This is exactly what has happened with the legacy of former Democratic U.S. Senator Al Gore, Sr. of Tennessee - the father of our current vice president - and his mythical "support" of civil rights. In a recent speech to the NAACP, Vice President Gore said his father lost his Senate seat because he supported ...
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African-Americans Are Being Left Behind in the Information Age, by Council Nedd

New Visions Commentary /
A 1998 Vanderbilt University study found that 73% of white high school and college students have a computer in their home, yet only 33% of their black peers do. 28% of white Americans with household incomes of less than $40,000 annually have home computers, compared with 13% of African-Americans. 13% of white households with income under $40,000 use the Internet, compared to 8% of African-American households. And white lower-income households that do access the Internet do so more frequently: When whites and blacks from households making under $40,000 were asked if they'd visited the World Wide Web in the past ...
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All Hail the Common Man, by Mike Ramey

New Visions Commentary /
I have often wondered why commencement speakers are usually someone rich and famous. It seems sad that the day of hearing parting words from a minister, elected official or other worthy speaker has almost disappeared. In the modern view, a graduation ceremony is not complete unless a "name" speaker is on the platform. The "politically correct" Hollywood crowd is anxious to tell you how you should face life. But they can't cross the street without their lawyers, accountants, psychics and bodyguards in tow. They do not revere a common man who sacrifices, encourages and often works several jobs so his ...
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Authority, by Eddie Huff

New Visions Commentary /
A New Visions Commentary paper published April 1999 by The National Center for Public Policy Research, 501 Capitol Court, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20002, 202/543-4110, Fax 202/543-5975, E-Mail [email protected], Web http://www.nationalcenter.org. Reprints permitted provided source is credited. I got a chuckle from a T-shirt I saw at a mall that read "you're not the boss of me." I've heard many children, including my own, use this line. What was funny to me, however, was that it was a 20-something woman wearing the shirt. I feel the shirt's message reflects where America is right now. Almost every issue becomes a shouting match ...
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Court Shoots an Air Ball on NCAA Academic Standards, by Michael King

New Visions Commentary /
When a federal court recently threw out the NCAA's academic standards for freshman college athletes because the standardized tests they were based on were thought to be culturally biased against blacks, it effectively set up yet another barrier for groups of our black youth entering the workforce. We have a responsibility to teach our youth the materials covered on college entrance exams. If our young men and women are not capable of doing well on standardized tests like the ACT and SAT, then WE as parents and WE as educators are the ones who have failed. It is not the ...
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The Big Lie: Margaret Sanger’s “Negro Project,” by Kimberley Jane Wilson

New Visions Commentary /
Many years ago, when I was still a first grader, my father and I went for a walk. We strolled past a brand-new building made of shining white concrete and gleaming glass doors. My father had been quite interested in this building, and we often walked past it during its construction. Now it was completed. You could see into the reception area from the street. The walls were painted in soft pastel colors. The furniture seemed - to my six-year-old eyes, at least - to be quite elegant. The staff seemed to be entirely made up of cheerful-looking young white ...
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Selected Project 21 Media Appearances

Project 21

Opportunity to Join

Help promote the diversity of opinion in black American community. Make the 21st century a time when character transcends race, and where open and honest debate flourishes.

Please complete this form to begin the process of becoming a member of the Project 21 black leadership network.

By clicking here, I agree to serve as a member of the Advisory Board of Project 21 - a program of the National Center for Public Policy Research. I understand membership does not imply agreement with all statements and views of all Project 21 members or the organization. I understand membership does not imply I am accepting any financial or other responsibility related to the success of Project 21 or the National Center. I understand that the National Center is a 501(c)(3) organization that does not seek to influence opinions on candidates or political parties, and I will abide by this rule as a member of the Project 21 Advisory Board. As Project 21 exists to examine new approaches and ideas and promote discussion of them, all participants in its programs - including formal publications and media appearances - must, of necessity, speak at all times on their own behalf. No endorsement by members of the Project 21 Advisory Council, other program participants or the National Center for Public Policy Research is implied.

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The National Center for Public Policy Research is a communications and research foundation supportive of a strong national defense and dedicated to providing free market solutions to today’s public policy problems. We believe that the principles of a free market, individual liberty and personal responsibility provide the greatest hope for meeting the challenges facing America in the 21st century.