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LATEST NEWS FROM PROJECT 21

Obama Could Have Been an Example, but Instead He Took Hope Away, Says Horace Cooper

Obama Could Have Been an Example, but Instead He Took Hope Away, Says Horace Cooper

ConservativeBlog.org /
In what Tucker Carlson called “about the best summation as I’ve heard,” Project 21 Co-Chairman Horace Cooper laid out how alleged “problem-solvers” can be blamed ...
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Black Activists Criticize NFL for Surrendering to Players’ Woke Demands

Black Activists Criticize NFL for Surrendering to Players’ Woke Demands

Press Release /
Potential Return of Kneeling for Flag and Anthem “Not Justified” Washington, D.C. – Activists with the Project 21 black leadership network condemned National Football League ...
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Liberal "Effort to Set Blacks Back Is Being Done in the Name of Saving Blacks"

Liberal “Effort to Set Blacks Back Is Being Done in the Name of Saving Blacks”

ConservativeBlog.org /
Noting how liberal politicos appear to condone rioting and looting in the wake of George Floyd’s death – even though it hurts black communities and ...
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Blueprint for a Better Deal for Black America

About Project 21

Project 21 is an initiative of The National Center for Public Policy Research to promote the views of African-Americans whose entrepreneurial spirit, dedication to family and commitment to individual responsibility have not traditionally been echoed by the nation’s civil rights establishment.

Project 21 participants have been interviewed by hundreds of media outlets, including the O’Reilly Factor, Hannity and Colmes, the CNN Morning News, Black Entertainment Television’s Lead Story, America’s Black Forum, the McLaughlin Group, C-SPAN’s Morning Journal and the Rush Limbaugh, Michael Reagan, Sean Hannity, G. Gordon Liddy and Larry King shows, as well as in newspapers such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, The Washington Times and many others.

Project 21 participants live all over the U.S. and have a variety of careers. What they have in common is a desire to make America a better place for African-Americans, and all Americans, to live and work. Project 21 members do this in a variety of ways in their own communities, and, through Project 21, by writing opinion editorials for newspapers, participating in public policy discussions on radio and television, by participating in policy panels, by giving speeches before student, business and community groups, and by advising policymakers at the national, state and local levels.

Project 21: A History

Project 21 is an initiative of The National Center for Public Policy Research to promote the views of African-Americans whose entrepreneurial spirit, sense of family and commitment to individual responsibility have not traditionally been echoed by the nation’s civil rights establishment. This became most obvious during the April 1992 riots in Los Angeles, when the media provided extended coverage of the reaction of liberal civil rights leaders to the events surrounding the Rodney King controversy. Curiously, the media made little mention of those in the African-American community who spoke out in favor of law and order and individual responsibility – and against the rioting.

Rather than merely complain about the lack of attention given to conservative and moderate African-Americans as typified by the coverage of the riots, The National Center for Public Policy Research convened a meeting of conservative and moderate African-American activists in mid-1992 to determine whether it was feasible to construct a network to bring conservative and moderate voices in the black community to the attention of the media. The answer was yes, and Project 21 was born. By March of 1993, Project 21 secured the necessary funding to hire a full-time coordinator to pursue its goals. Project 21’s mission includes the active promotion of conservative and moderate viewpoints by Project 21’s network of members in the media, and the ongoing recruitment of new members to be promoted.

Project 21 acts as a public relations network for moderate and conservative African-Americans, and is interested in promoting those African-Americans who want to discuss their beliefs not only in the privacy of their own homes but in thousands, sometimes millions, of homes across America. Whether a member is a talented writer, articulate speaker, dedicated policy analyst or just have interesting viewpoints on important issues, Project 21 is there to help its members get recognition.

Project 21 has enjoyed enormous success. Project 21’s network of African-American moderates and conservatives have been interviewed by hundreds of newspapers, talk radio shows and television programs throughout the country. Participants have been featured on such programs as CNN & Company, CNN Morning News, The McLaughlin Group, C-SPAN’s Morning Journal, Larry King, Rush Limbaugh, The Michael Reagan Show, BET’s Our Voices, and America’s Black Forum as well as in newspapers such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, The Washington Times, The Detroit News, USA Today, The Cleveland Plain-Dealer, and many others.

Project 21 members have been published, quoted or interviewed over 35,000 times since the program was launched in 1992.

Project 21 first burst into attention following the release of Black America 1994: Changing Direction in January 1994. A 77-page volume, Black America 1994 is a comprehensive assessment of the challenges and opportunities facing the African-American community. A collection of 15 essays written by Project 21 participants, the report addressed important contemporary issues including economic stagnation, crime, education, health, welfare, and the disintegration of the black family.

In the weeks following the report’s release, its contributors participated in several hundred media interviews, and Project 21 received nearly 5,000 requests for information and numerous offers of support.

Project 21 released a major report, The Health Care Ghetto: African-Americans and Health Care Reform, at a National Press Club press conference in August, 1994. The report was the first of its kind to analyze how various health care reform initiatives would affect minority communities.

In January 1995, Project 21 released a second annual report: Black America 1995: A New Beginning. The report consisted of 38 essays by Project 21 members on topics ranging from the information superhighway to crime. In January 1996, a series of profiles were released of black conservatives and moderates who shun government spending and embrace greater community involvement as the way to solve problems. Black America 1996: A Time for Renewal also included an agenda created by black conservatives and moderates outlining what government needs to do – and what it needs to stop doing – if people are going to start solving their own problems.

In 1997, following two years of research, Project 21 released an in-depth report: Black America 1997: How Government Harms Charities… And How Some are Succeeding Anyway. Until now, it has not been widely known that humanitarian groups suffer from government’s regulatory harassment. The 90-page report received front page newspaper coverage in Washington D.C. and led to calls from lawmakers interested in repealing the regulations that harm the ability of charities to help the poor.

Project 21 also has taken a lead role in bringing to public attention the fact that a substantial number of government environmental rules have a disproportionately negative economic impact on minorities. In addition to assisting with the research and publication of over 60 studies, op-eds and press releases on this topic in recent years, in 2002, joining with the John P. McGovern Center for Environmental and Regulatory Affairs to form a Center for Environmental Justice, Project 21 released a comprehensive econometric analysis of the impact of so-called “smart growth” regulations on minorities. The study, “Smart Growth and Its Effects on Housing Markets: The New Segregation” was published in November, 2002.

Project 21 is also actively involved in educating the public on proposals to empower communities rather than the government. For instance, Project 21 was instrumental in promoting the ideas incorporated in the Community Renewal Act, sponsored by Reps. Jim Talent (R-MO) and J.C. Watts (R-OK) in the 105th Congress. Project 21’s Contract with Black America, proposed to the leadership of the Republican Congress in January 1995, started the process that eventually led to the crafting of the Community Renewal Act.

Press Releases

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New Visions Commentary

Blacks “Gored” By a Lie: Al Gore Sr., the GOP and the Civil Rights Act of 1964, by R.D. Davis

New Visions Commentary /
A New Visions Commentary paper published May 1999 by The National Center for Public Policy Research. Reprints permitted provided source is credited. It is easy to control the minds of a people. All one has to do is change history by lying about the past. This is exactly what has happened with the legacy of former Democratic U.S. Senator Al Gore, Sr. of Tennessee - the father of our current vice president - and his mythical "support" of civil rights. In a recent speech to the NAACP, Vice President Gore said his father lost his Senate seat because he supported ...
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African-Americans Are Being Left Behind in the Information Age, by Council Nedd

New Visions Commentary /
A 1998 Vanderbilt University study found that 73% of white high school and college students have a computer in their home, yet only 33% of their black peers do. 28% of white Americans with household incomes of less than $40,000 annually have home computers, compared with 13% of African-Americans. 13% of white households with income under $40,000 use the Internet, compared to 8% of African-American households. And white lower-income households that do access the Internet do so more frequently: When whites and blacks from households making under $40,000 were asked if they'd visited the World Wide Web in the past ...
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All Hail the Common Man, by Mike Ramey

New Visions Commentary /
I have often wondered why commencement speakers are usually someone rich and famous. It seems sad that the day of hearing parting words from a minister, elected official or other worthy speaker has almost disappeared. In the modern view, a graduation ceremony is not complete unless a "name" speaker is on the platform. The "politically correct" Hollywood crowd is anxious to tell you how you should face life. But they can't cross the street without their lawyers, accountants, psychics and bodyguards in tow. They do not revere a common man who sacrifices, encourages and often works several jobs so his ...
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Authority, by Eddie Huff

New Visions Commentary /
A New Visions Commentary paper published April 1999 by The National Center for Public Policy Research, 501 Capitol Court, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20002, 202/543-4110, Fax 202/543-5975, E-Mail [email protected], Web http://www.nationalcenter.org. Reprints permitted provided source is credited. I got a chuckle from a T-shirt I saw at a mall that read "you're not the boss of me." I've heard many children, including my own, use this line. What was funny to me, however, was that it was a 20-something woman wearing the shirt. I feel the shirt's message reflects where America is right now. Almost every issue becomes a shouting match ...
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Court Shoots an Air Ball on NCAA Academic Standards, by Michael King

New Visions Commentary /
When a federal court recently threw out the NCAA's academic standards for freshman college athletes because the standardized tests they were based on were thought to be culturally biased against blacks, it effectively set up yet another barrier for groups of our black youth entering the workforce. We have a responsibility to teach our youth the materials covered on college entrance exams. If our young men and women are not capable of doing well on standardized tests like the ACT and SAT, then WE as parents and WE as educators are the ones who have failed. It is not the ...
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The Big Lie: Margaret Sanger’s “Negro Project,” by Kimberley Jane Wilson

New Visions Commentary /
Many years ago, when I was still a first grader, my father and I went for a walk. We strolled past a brand-new building made of shining white concrete and gleaming glass doors. My father had been quite interested in this building, and we often walked past it during its construction. Now it was completed. You could see into the reception area from the street. The walls were painted in soft pastel colors. The furniture seemed - to my six-year-old eyes, at least - to be quite elegant. The staff seemed to be entirely made up of cheerful-looking young white ...
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God Stands Knocking at the Door of America’s Heart: Will the Tragedy at Columbine High Be Enough to Let Him Back In? by Bishop Earl Jackson Sr.

New Visions Commentary /
How many nightmarish scenes of youth violence must America witness before we realize that this is the harvest of a generation which has turned its back on God? We have banned prayer from the public schools and God from public life. What happened on April 20th at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado was not the result of political or economic problems, but spiritual breakdown. What is even more disturbing is that things are likely to get much worse unless Americans turn our hearts to God in spiritual and moral renewal. As part of that renewal, the hostility toward people ...
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The Real Racists, by James Coleman

New Visions Commentary /
Far too many Americans have it in their heads that racism makes a home on the right wing of our political spectrum. It is the political left, however, that has presided over the decline of our inner cities. It is people from left-wing circles of thought that equate poverty and minorities, oftentimes using the terms "black" and "poor" interchangeably. This mindset, of course, is the impetus behind "affirmative action" policies for minorities in general and blacks in particular. Leftists assume that all blacks need a hand, even if their last name is Cosby or Winfrey. It is also the left ...
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Black History Month: A Retrospective, by Amy Ridenour

New Visions Commentary /
I don't know about you, but I've never known what to think about Black History Month. Whenever I think of it, my first thought is invariably: What comic decided to make Black History Month the shortest month of the year? Seriously, though, what does Black History Month really stand for? When I walk or drive down a street during Black History Month, I often see signs proclaiming "X Company Salutes Black History Month." What does this mean? Are they simply playing lip service to the idea of saluting black people? Are they using Black History Month to lure black customers? ...
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Social Security is Unfair to Black Americans, by John Meredith

New Visions Commentary /
A New Visions Commentary paper published March 1999 by The National Center for Public Policy Research, 501 Capitol Ct NE, Washington, DC 20002, 202/543-4110, Fax 202-543-5975, E-Mail [email protected] Reprints permitted provided source is credited. If a group of strangers living far away asked you to give them a part of your paycheck every time you got paid, and in return offered to give you part of the money back after you retired, would you take the deal? Probably not. Yet that's what many black Americans do every time they get paid because this is what happens when they pay their ...
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Impeachment Infringes on My Family Time, by E. LeMay Lathan

New Visions Commentary /
Is President Clinton above the law? I keep asking myself that question as I listen to the impeachment proceedings. I've heard both the White House's excuses and the accusations of the Office of Independent Counsel, and I don't have a problem sorting through this mess. While not admitting all the facts, President Clinton says his answers to specific questions asked of him during his grand jury testimony were legally accurate. Since he said he was sorry and asked our forgiveness, everything is okay again and we are back to page one. I think not. While my wife and I spent ...
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To Assure That the Republican Party is Open and Accessible to All, by Bishop Earl Jackson Sr.

New Visions Commentary /
When a political party goes on public record to establish a foundational principle, that declaration should be studiously upheld and its members should hold one another accountable for its violation. Many Republicans and conservatives remember the phrase "to assure that the Republican Party is open and accessible to all" as being part of the last sentence in the preamble of the Republican National Convention's (RNC) "Rules of the Republican Party," adopted on August 12, 1996. The party of Lincoln is now called into question by news reports that prominent Republicans have spoken before or are members of the Council of ...
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Why I Work on Martin’s Birthday, by C. Mason Weaver

New Visions Commentary /
A New Visions Commentary paper published February 1999 by The National Center for Public Policy Research, 501 Capitol Ct., N.E., Washington, DC 20002, 202/543-4110, Fax 202-543-5975, E-Mail [email protected], Web http://www.nationalcenter.org. Reprints permitted provided source is credited. I worked hard during the Martin Luther King Holiday. I always try very hard to be busy on that day. Unlike other holidays, it is not the time for bar-b-ques and family picnics; it is a time for reflection and motivation. I understand that the struggle of the civil rights era was out of love for the next generation. It was not a struggle ...
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Black Americans Would Benefit From Private Social Security Accounts

New Visions Commentary /
President Clinton's announcement in his January State of the Union speech that he supports investing Social Security funds in the stock market was a half-step in the right direction for saving Social Security. Unfortunately, the President's prescription did nothing to end a pervasive problem with the current system: As currently structured, Social Security is unfair to many Americans, particularly, blacks and other minorities. The President needs to take another step in the right direction, and allow individuals to privately invest all or part of the money they currently pay to the government in Social Security taxes. The Social Security system ...
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Impeachment and the Rule of Law, by Faye Anderson

New Visions Commentary /
A New Visions Commentary paper published January 1999 by The National Center for Public Policy Research, 501 Capitol Court, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20002, 202/543-4110, Fax (202) 543-5975, E-Mail [email protected], Web http://www.nationalcenter.org. Reprints permitted provided source is credited. It's the rule of law, stupid. The fundamental principle that holds together our multiracial and multiethnic democracy seems to have gotten lost in the partisan din surrounding the impeachment drama in Washington. African Americans, who are President Bill Clinton's staunchest supporters, should be especially vigilant in ensuring the primacy of the rule of law. It is we, after all, who were denied equal ...
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Who’s a Leader? by Kimberly Wilson

New Visions Commentary /
It has been said that there is a crisis in black leadership. I agree. But as a black woman, more and more, I find myself questioning the term "black leader." Who really is a black leader? Is it Al Sharpton at his most outrageous? Is it Khalid Abdul Muhammad when he's spewing hateful insults at Jews and other races? Or is it Kweisi Mfume at his most extravagant? Is the rapper/actor Ice-T or Sister Souljah a leader? Was the late, wildly-talented and charismatic Tupac Shakur a leader? Frankly, I believe that many black public figures are simply crowned as leaders ...
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The Ring Does Matter, by Mike Ramey

New Visions Commentary /
Lots of good news was broadcast over the nation's airwaves during the past few months. Drug use among young people decreased. More young adults are discovering the joys of marriage. The number of out-of-wedlock births is also trending downward. Of the three, the social custom of marriage becoming increasingly "acceptable" shows that the social engineers, Washington think-tankers and liberal supporters of free sex without esponsibility were given a major black eye yet again. No government programs are responsible for booming marriage rates. No filibusters occurred on the floor of the U.S. Senate to make this achievement possible. No proclamations from ...
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The Money Trail to Better Education, by Star Parker

New Visions Commentary /
In recently donating $100 million to allow 50,000 needy children to attend private school, investment banker Ted Forstmann and Wal-Mart executive John Walton will do far more to improve the education of inner-city youths than philanthropist Walter Annenberg's much-vaunted $500 million gift to public schools could ever do. To understand why is to understand the corrosive problem at the root of America's education policy. In the age of instant gratification and inflated self-esteems, the cultural mantra of "bigger, better, faster, more" has guided government's approach to education. Per-pupil spending has increased five-fold since the 1950s, yet every quantifiable measure shows ...
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Black Folks and Bill Clinton, by Kimberly Wilson

New Visions Commentary /
One of the more frequent comments made during the Clinton/Lewinsky scandal is that black people are solidly in the President's corner. Polls show as many as 85% of us support Bill Clinton. I'm one who's not so sure about that. Polls are not are the final word. I don't recall anyone calling my friends or me to ask our opinions. Jesse Jackson and the Congressional Black Caucus will surely defend Clinton to the bitter end, but many blacks are wondering why. Why should black congressmen - or any Black American - be passionate about Bill Clinton's tarnished presidency? It is ...
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New Cool vs. Old School, by Mike Ramey

New Visions Commentary /
We have heard a lot of talk about the youth of today. We have heard how "unreliable" or "unrespectful" they can be toward adult authority. Yet, how many of us "old folks" have actually taken the time to sit down with our youth to find out what makes them tick? How many of us find out about their dreams, hopes and ambitions? It's easy to ship our kids off to a social worker, job training center or recreation program for fun and activities, yet we miss out on getting the chance to know them. Many of us in the African-American ...
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Selected Project 21 Media Appearances

Project 21

Opportunity to Join

Help promote the diversity of opinion in black American community. Make the 21st century a time when character transcends race, and where open and honest debate flourishes.

Please complete this form to begin the process of becoming a member of the Project 21 black leadership network.

By clicking here, I agree to serve as a member of the Advisory Board of Project 21 - a program of the National Center for Public Policy Research. I understand membership does not imply agreement with all statements and views of all Project 21 members or the organization. I understand membership does not imply I am accepting any financial or other responsibility related to the success of Project 21 or the National Center. I understand that the National Center is a 501(c)(3) organization that does not seek to influence opinions on candidates or political parties, and I will abide by this rule as a member of the Project 21 Advisory Board. As Project 21 exists to examine new approaches and ideas and promote discussion of them, all participants in its programs - including formal publications and media appearances - must, of necessity, speak at all times on their own behalf. No endorsement by members of the Project 21 Advisory Council, other program participants or the National Center for Public Policy Research is implied.

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The National Center for Public Policy Research is a communications and research foundation supportive of a strong national defense and dedicated to providing free market solutions to today’s public policy problems. We believe that the principles of a free market, individual liberty and personal responsibility provide the greatest hope for meeting the challenges facing America in the 21st century.