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LATEST NEWS FROM PROJECT 21

Black Activists Applaud Defunding of “Critical Race Theory” Training

Black Activists Applaud Defunding of “Critical Race Theory” Training

Press Release /
Trump Order Would Purge “Tired, Old and Evil Idea” From Federal Employment Washington, D.C. – Members of the Project 21 black leadership network applauded the ...
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Blacks "Won’t Be Fooled Again" by Liberal Scaremongers

Blacks “Won’t Be Fooled Again” by Liberal Scaremongers

ConservativeBlog.org /
On MSNBC, Yamiche Alcindor – the White House correspondent for taxpayer-subsidized PBS – claimed that black Americans “understand that they are being treated like second-class ...
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Critics Can’t Blame Trump for Riots They Prevent Him from Stopping

Critics Can’t Blame Trump for Riots They Prevent Him from Stopping

ConservativeBlog.org /
Despite Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler claiming “[t]here is no place for looting, arson or vandalism in our city,” there have been nightly protests there – ...
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Blueprint for a Better Deal for Black America

About Project 21

Project 21 is an initiative of The National Center for Public Policy Research to promote the views of African-Americans whose entrepreneurial spirit, dedication to family and commitment to individual responsibility have not traditionally been echoed by the nation’s civil rights establishment.

Project 21 participants have been interviewed by hundreds of media outlets, including the O’Reilly Factor, Hannity and Colmes, the CNN Morning News, Black Entertainment Television’s Lead Story, America’s Black Forum, the McLaughlin Group, C-SPAN’s Morning Journal and the Rush Limbaugh, Michael Reagan, Sean Hannity, G. Gordon Liddy and Larry King shows, as well as in newspapers such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, The Washington Times and many others.

Project 21 participants live all over the U.S. and have a variety of careers. What they have in common is a desire to make America a better place for African-Americans, and all Americans, to live and work. Project 21 members do this in a variety of ways in their own communities, and, through Project 21, by writing opinion editorials for newspapers, participating in public policy discussions on radio and television, by participating in policy panels, by giving speeches before student, business and community groups, and by advising policymakers at the national, state and local levels.

Project 21: A History

Project 21 is an initiative of The National Center for Public Policy Research to promote the views of African-Americans whose entrepreneurial spirit, sense of family and commitment to individual responsibility have not traditionally been echoed by the nation’s civil rights establishment. This became most obvious during the April 1992 riots in Los Angeles, when the media provided extended coverage of the reaction of liberal civil rights leaders to the events surrounding the Rodney King controversy. Curiously, the media made little mention of those in the African-American community who spoke out in favor of law and order and individual responsibility – and against the rioting.

Rather than merely complain about the lack of attention given to conservative and moderate African-Americans as typified by the coverage of the riots, The National Center for Public Policy Research convened a meeting of conservative and moderate African-American activists in mid-1992 to determine whether it was feasible to construct a network to bring conservative and moderate voices in the black community to the attention of the media. The answer was yes, and Project 21 was born. By March of 1993, Project 21 secured the necessary funding to hire a full-time coordinator to pursue its goals. Project 21’s mission includes the active promotion of conservative and moderate viewpoints by Project 21’s network of members in the media, and the ongoing recruitment of new members to be promoted.

Project 21 acts as a public relations network for moderate and conservative African-Americans, and is interested in promoting those African-Americans who want to discuss their beliefs not only in the privacy of their own homes but in thousands, sometimes millions, of homes across America. Whether a member is a talented writer, articulate speaker, dedicated policy analyst or just have interesting viewpoints on important issues, Project 21 is there to help its members get recognition.

Project 21 has enjoyed enormous success. Project 21’s network of African-American moderates and conservatives have been interviewed by hundreds of newspapers, talk radio shows and television programs throughout the country. Participants have been featured on such programs as CNN & Company, CNN Morning News, The McLaughlin Group, C-SPAN’s Morning Journal, Larry King, Rush Limbaugh, The Michael Reagan Show, BET’s Our Voices, and America’s Black Forum as well as in newspapers such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, The Washington Times, The Detroit News, USA Today, The Cleveland Plain-Dealer, and many others.

Project 21 members have been published, quoted or interviewed over 35,000 times since the program was launched in 1992.

Project 21 first burst into attention following the release of Black America 1994: Changing Direction in January 1994. A 77-page volume, Black America 1994 is a comprehensive assessment of the challenges and opportunities facing the African-American community. A collection of 15 essays written by Project 21 participants, the report addressed important contemporary issues including economic stagnation, crime, education, health, welfare, and the disintegration of the black family.

In the weeks following the report’s release, its contributors participated in several hundred media interviews, and Project 21 received nearly 5,000 requests for information and numerous offers of support.

Project 21 released a major report, The Health Care Ghetto: African-Americans and Health Care Reform, at a National Press Club press conference in August, 1994. The report was the first of its kind to analyze how various health care reform initiatives would affect minority communities.

In January 1995, Project 21 released a second annual report: Black America 1995: A New Beginning. The report consisted of 38 essays by Project 21 members on topics ranging from the information superhighway to crime. In January 1996, a series of profiles were released of black conservatives and moderates who shun government spending and embrace greater community involvement as the way to solve problems. Black America 1996: A Time for Renewal also included an agenda created by black conservatives and moderates outlining what government needs to do – and what it needs to stop doing – if people are going to start solving their own problems.

In 1997, following two years of research, Project 21 released an in-depth report: Black America 1997: How Government Harms Charities… And How Some are Succeeding Anyway. Until now, it has not been widely known that humanitarian groups suffer from government’s regulatory harassment. The 90-page report received front page newspaper coverage in Washington D.C. and led to calls from lawmakers interested in repealing the regulations that harm the ability of charities to help the poor.

Project 21 also has taken a lead role in bringing to public attention the fact that a substantial number of government environmental rules have a disproportionately negative economic impact on minorities. In addition to assisting with the research and publication of over 60 studies, op-eds and press releases on this topic in recent years, in 2002, joining with the John P. McGovern Center for Environmental and Regulatory Affairs to form a Center for Environmental Justice, Project 21 released a comprehensive econometric analysis of the impact of so-called “smart growth” regulations on minorities. The study, “Smart Growth and Its Effects on Housing Markets: The New Segregation” was published in November, 2002.

Project 21 is also actively involved in educating the public on proposals to empower communities rather than the government. For instance, Project 21 was instrumental in promoting the ideas incorporated in the Community Renewal Act, sponsored by Reps. Jim Talent (R-MO) and J.C. Watts (R-OK) in the 105th Congress. Project 21’s Contract with Black America, proposed to the leadership of the Republican Congress in January 1995, started the process that eventually led to the crafting of the Community Renewal Act.

Press Releases

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New Visions Commentary

Our Private Sex Lives Matter, by Patricia Funderburke Ware

New Visions Commentary /
As a recently re-married African-American woman who was a single mom for about twenty years, I strongly believe our private sex lives do matter. I believe they have an indirect but significant impact on many of the economic, educational, health, racial and criminal justice problems in this country. Our inability, as individuals and as a nation, to confront sexual behavior in a straightforward, honest and credible way only pushes the problem toward the point of no return. Let's consider a society that decides people's sex lives are no one else's business. If one believes they can randomly have sex with ...
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It’s OK to Leave the Plantation: A Book Review, by Kimberley Wilson

New Visions Commentary /
Author and commentator Clarence Mason Weaver has a message for Black America: It's OK to Leave the Plantation. That's the title of his new book, and the sum of his message. Some people might wonder just what Weaver means. After all, the classic plantation system was destroyed at the end of the Civil War. But if you are of the mind that all Blacks must automatically vote for one particular political party or if you accept the notion that all Blacks must hold certain views with no room for dissension, then you are in a state of mental bondage. If ...
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Do Standardized Tests Add Up? by LisaRose Blanchette

New Visions Commentary /
As a teacher preparing to enter my 11th year at the front of the classroom, I feel the need to comment about the weight placed on standardized test scores. It's not about improving the students. Instead, it is all about getting more money. A standardized test has little to do with curriculum. Its authors work for a testing company, not any school district. The test is based on whatever textbook(s) the writers follow, regardless of the actual classroom usage of those texts. Herein lies the problem. Textbooks are written by people in the education field. Since there is no national ...
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Marion Barry: Last of the Black Emperors, by Kimberley Wilson

New Visions Commentary /
On May 21, 1998, Marion Barry announced to the world that he would not be a candidate for a fifth term as mayor of Washington, D.C. I hardly know whether to laugh or cry. Marion and the city of Washington have been locked in a long and sometimes torturous embrace for more than 16 years. In his heyday, he cast a long, dark shadow over this town. The first thing a visitor to the District of Columbia sees is Marion Barry. His name is everywhere you look. It's on the city's welcome signs, the Reeves Municipal Center and on every ...
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Morality Over Money, by Mike Ramey

New Visions Commentary /
I recently saw a very interesting and funny video entitled "Afros and Bellbottoms." It featured the well-known African-American comic and television talk show host Sinbad. I'll admit I was a bit skeptical. With many comics making fortunes by tossing around jokes about bodily functions, four-letter words and sexual situations like they were leaves falling from trees, I hoped Sinbad's video would be a welcome departure from this valley of filth and profanity. Much to my surprise, the 74-minute presentation was squeaky clean by modern standards. Sinbad's performance was a romp through the 70's -- from plastic-covered furniture to two-parent families ...
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He’s Got More than Game. He’s Got Perspective, by B.B. Robinson

New Visions Commentary /
Spike Lee has done the right thing again! His new movie "He Got Game" touches almost every nerve and fiber of the African-American contemporary experience. More importantly, Lee provides a valid metaphorical perspective on that experience. If you want a starting point for discussing the economic, political, social, educational or entertainment experiences of African-Americans, "He Got Game" is your movie. However, because the African-American experience is enmeshed in the American experience, the movie's relevance cannot be restricted to ethnic grounds. The two main story lines are simple enough: (1) A father's attempt to reunite with his son after a long ...
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James Earl Ray is Survived by a Family of Troubling Questions, by Deroy Murdock

New Visions Commentary /
Dead men tell no tales, but the questions they inspire can be immortal. This is true for James Earl Ray, Dr. Martin Luther King's convicted assassin who died in prison April 23 of liver failure at age 70. Alive and well, Earl Caldwell still wonders what really happened on April 4, 1968 in Memphis. He thought he heard a bomb. The then-New York Times correspondent dashed from his room at the Lorraine Motel. He saw a man arise from a crouched position in the bushes across the street. Facing the balcony above Caldwell, with their backs to those bushes, Andrew ...
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Working in a White Man’s World, by Kimberley Wilson

New Visions Commentary /
For many people, The Black Man's Guide to Working in a White Man's World is going to be hard to read. This is not because it is a dry, scholarly tome, but because it will make quite a few readers squirm with discomfort. The Guide's author, E. LeMay Lathan, hits hard and speaks plainly. To those who come to this book looking for a mishmash of theory and finger-pointing at whites, Lathan offers hard truth instead. It comes as a splash of cold water: to those readers who approach it with open minds, this book will be as refreshing as ...
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Lower the Lifeboats, Now! Public Schools are Sinking, by Phyllis Berry Myers

New Visions Commentary /
Inner-city public schools are like a sinking ship, and the children on board need to be rescued before it's too late. Their schools are sinking fast and educational opportunities are being lost. Roofs leak. Boilers are busted. Science and computer labs, if they even exist, are out of date. Classrooms are crowded. Drug and violence are commonplace. Dropout rates are high; expectations and standards are low. Inner-city parents, many of whom are low-income, are tired of waiting for others to save their children from failing schools. They pushing for and beginning to adopt all kinds of innovative strategies to turn ...
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Slap in the Face of the Reverend Floyd Flake, by Jackie Cissell

New Visions Commentary /
Former Democratic congressman Floyd Flake of New York was recently uninvited to the Indiana Black Legislative Caucus Prayer Breakfast. Now, if anyone should be welcome at the Indiana Black Legislative Caucus Prayer Breakfast, it should be Floyd Flake. Rev. Flake spent six terms in the U.S. House of Representatives, where he was a senior member of the Congressional Black Caucus. He is also pastor of the 9,000 member Allen A.M.E. Church in New York. All of these qualifications would seem to make him a shoo-in for the Prayer Breakfast, right? Wrong! The Rev. Flake has a problem -- a problem ...
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Black History Month: Why February? by C. Mason Weaver

New Visions Commentary /
This is Black History Month. I wonder who picked the coldest, wettest, shortest month of the year to remember the history of African people and their descendants in America? How did we come to have Black History Month in February? Why not remember the history of Black people during January for the month Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation and the birthday of Dr. King? Perhaps, we could recognize it during December for the make-believe holiday of Kwanzaa. How about June in recognition of "Juneteenth," the liberation of slaves in Texas? Why February? Slavery was abolished by Congress in April 1862; ...
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Recollections of Racial Identity, by Jackie Cissell

New Visions Commentary /
I recently completed a sociology class in which we covered a section on how communities are identified by race, class and other factors. During the class, we discussed our earliest recollection of racial identity, and the benefits and struggles associated with those childhood recollections. My earliest recollection of my racial identity was at the age of eight. The time was the mid-1960s. I clearly remember my parents and other members of the NAACP poring over maps, discussing certain areas of the city where blacks could not live. It was during this time I realized that blacks could not live anywhere ...
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Amistad: Reigniting Fears Through History, by B.B. Robinson – January 1998

New Visions Commentary /
Like most Americans, European-Americans without racist attitudes fear a weak economy, a bad president or schools unable to educate their children. However, many African-Americans believe that European-Americans with racist attitudes still harbor a genuine fear of the day when so-called "minorities" will dominate the nation's population. U.S. Bureau of the Census projections confirm this will happen around the year 2050. European-American racists must fear that day the way their forefathers feared Nat Turner. Amistad, the new blockbuster movie, can ignite that same fear through its coverage of history. It is a great movie that should be seen because it enables ...
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A Street Named Martin Luther King, by Kimberley Wilson

New Visions Commentary /
Recently my husband and I were sightseeing in a large urban city. I misread the map and, instead of arriving at the wax museum, we found ourselves headed for the Martin Luther King Memorial Bridge. "Hon, we better turn around. We're about to get in trouble," I announced. My husband quickly reminded me that, except in action adventure-movies, it's mighty difficult (not to mention illegal) to make a U-turn on a bridge. There was no turning back. As we expected the MLK bridge led to a poverty pocket. Actually, that's too nice an expression for what awaited us. The place ...
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Amistad: Reingniting Fears Through History, by B. B. Robinson

New Visions Commentary /
We all have fears. Like most Americans, European-Americans without racist attitudes fear a weak economy, a bad president or schools unable to educate their children. However, many African-Americans believe that European-Americans with racist attitudes still harbor a genuine fear of the day when so-called "minorities" will dominate the nation's population. U.S. Bureau of the Census projections confirm this will happen around the year 2050. European-American racists must fear that day the way their forefathers feared Nat Turner. Amistad, the new blockbuster movie, can ignite that same fear through its coverage of history. It is a great movie that should be ...
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Succeeding American-Style, by James Coleman

New Visions Commentary /
When I was a child, my mother told me black people had to be twice as good as people of European ancestry if they wanted to succeed. I never took her advice as a deterrent, just a statement of fact. I chalked it up to understanding the rules of the game. As in any game, there are obstacles and restrictions. Winners master the rules and excel, while losers complain about them and fail. For example, outfielders in baseball don't complain that they have to run around while the pitcher, catcher and other infielders stay in roughly the same place. They ...
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Is UNICEF Aiding AIDS? by Kevin Pritchett

New Visions Commentary /
by Kevin PritchettA New Visions Commentary paper published November 1997 by The National Center for Public Policy Research, 501 Capitol Court, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20002, 202/543-4110, Fax (202) 543-5975, E-Mail [email protected], Web http://www.nationalcenter.org. Reprints permitted provided source is credited. Whether media tycoon Ted Turner's recent $1 billion pledge to the United Nations is altruistic or just a stunt is not yet clear. What is certain, however, is that he won't be getting his money's worth or saving humanity. If Mr. Turner had performed the same due diligence as he surely does on his business investments, he would have found that ...
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The Emergence of Clarence Thomas, by Paul Weyrich

New Visions Commentary /
by Paul WeyrichA New Visions Commentary paper published September 1997 by The National Center for Public Policy Research, 501 Capitol Court, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20002, 202/543-4110, Fax (202) 543-5975, [email protected], Web http://www.project21.org. Reprints permitted provided source is credited. The headline on the front page of Sunday's [July 27] Washington Times read "Thomas Increasing in Stature as Justice." It virtually jumped off the page. The Times piece, by Frank J. Murray, acknowledges what Supreme Court watchers such as Tom Jipping have been saying for some time now. Clarence Thomas is slowly but surely becoming one of the most influential of the ...
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Competition and Experience are the Keys to Achievement, by Mike Ramey

New Visions Commentary /
One of my favorite baseball stories involves two well-known players: Hank Aaron and Yogi Berra. The story dates back to when they were young men. Aaron and Berra were playing in the same game for opposing teams. Aaron stepped up to the plate, bat in hand, ready to take care of business. Berra, who was in his position as catcher, noticed that Aaron was holding the bat with the label facing the wrong way. Berra whispered to Aaron: "Hold the bat so you can read the label." Aaron whispered back to Berra: "I didn't come here to read, I came ...
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How Social Security Shortchanges Black Americans, by Deroy Murdock

New Visions Commentary /
By yesterday's definition of racism, the answer is no. For all its failings, Social Security was concocted in 1935 with glowing intentions. Rescuing the elderly from poverty -- regardless of race -- is an idea to which only the flintiest would object. By today's definition, however, a negative "disparate impact" on minorities trumps even the most pristine motives. Perhaps Social Security should be investigated by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. As it is, Social Security is a legalized pyramid scheme built atop unstable demographic sands. It threatens to collapse into rubble once the Baby Boomers retire and Generation-Xers begin carrying ...
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Selected Project 21 Media Appearances

Project 21

Opportunity to Join

Help promote the diversity of opinion in black American community. Make the 21st century a time when character transcends race, and where open and honest debate flourishes.

Please complete this form to begin the process of becoming a member of the Project 21 black leadership network.

By clicking here, I agree to serve as a member of the Advisory Board of Project 21 - a program of the National Center for Public Policy Research. I understand membership does not imply agreement with all statements and views of all Project 21 members or the organization. I understand membership does not imply I am accepting any financial or other responsibility related to the success of Project 21 or the National Center. I understand that the National Center is a 501(c)(3) organization that does not seek to influence opinions on candidates or political parties, and I will abide by this rule as a member of the Project 21 Advisory Board. As Project 21 exists to examine new approaches and ideas and promote discussion of them, all participants in its programs - including formal publications and media appearances - must, of necessity, speak at all times on their own behalf. No endorsement by members of the Project 21 Advisory Council, other program participants or the National Center for Public Policy Research is implied.

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The National Center for Public Policy Research is a communications and research foundation supportive of a strong national defense and dedicated to providing free market solutions to today’s public policy problems. We believe that the principles of a free market, individual liberty and personal responsibility provide the greatest hope for meeting the challenges facing America in the 21st century.