Racist Roots of the “Anti-Racism” Con

Anti-racism consultants like Ibram X. Kendi can make tens of thousands of dollars for training sessions and speeches for corporations, public schools and government offices. “They aren’t selling you a solution,” said Fox News Channel host Jesse Watters. “They’re selling you a problem.”

In a discussion on the “Jesse Watters Primetime” program, Watters added that this is a profitable endeavor because these consultants lecture that white racism is a systemic problem that is “never solved” – meaning that they “can line their own pockets” by giving speech after speech after speech without the expectation of a resolution.

Project 21 Co-Chairman Horace Cooper pointed out to Watters that “we’re living in a culture where, when you highlight issues of race, people think they’re going to have to stand up and salute smartly.”

“This isn’t antiracism discussion,” Horace noted. “This is racist discussion!”

Manhattan Institute Fellow Heather Mac Donald, author of the book “The Diversity Delusion,” said that the speakers’ claims of pervasive, systemic racism are unsubstantiated today because “there’s not a single mainstream institution that is not twisting itself into knots to hire and promote as many blacks as possible.”

Mac Donald noted that an “academic skills gap” – which can be addressed by schools and parents –  is “the problem that we, and people like Kendi, should be talking about.”

Asked by Watters if “companies and the colleges know this is a little bit of a shakedown,” Horace responded:

If you listen to some of the nonsense… that these presenters bring to the table, it includes things like assuming certain things about people solely because they’re white and solely because they’re black. We used to call that bigotry…

Horace noted that what the radical activists are doing actually has historical precedence – just not in the way they might want it portrayed:

Now it’s lucrative for these individuals to do these things. But it would be lucrative too– if this were 1920 – for David Duke to do this. The only difference is most people of good sense and goodwill understand they shouldn’t say that, and they shouldn’t pay him.



Project 21, a leading voice of black conservatives for over 25 years, is sponsored by the National Center for Public Policy Research. Its members have been quoted, interviewed or published over 40,000 times since the program was created in 1992. Contributions to the National Center are tax-deductible and greatly appreciated, and may be earmarked exclusively for the use of Project 21.