TED HAYES

Ted Hayes, a member of the Project 21 black leadership network’s national advisory council, is a long-time Los Angeles-area activist known for his work on issues such as civil rights, homelessness and immigration. He has also run for public office on several occasions.

Hayes is probably best known for his activism on behalf of the homeless and his quest to promote initiative and empowerment among the homeless population of Los Angeles. In the 1980s, he was instrumental in the founding of the Justiceville shantytown in Los Angeles. In the 1990s, he helped create the innovative Dome Village — a community of geodesic structures that was built with corporate support to help cheaply and safely house the homeless in Los Angeles. A “National Homeless Plan” that was created by Hayes to help end the problem of homelessness was supported by resolutions passed by lawmakers in the county and city of Los Angeles in the late 1990s. A copy of the plan was presented to the Clinton Administration in 1998.

From his homelessness projects and community activism, Hayes formed what became known as the Compton Homies and POPz cricket team in 1995. This world-renowned team has been invited to play in Europe on several occasions.

Hayes is the founder of the Capitol Hill National Caucus, a group that opposes amnesty for illegal aliens because of the negative effect the influx of immigrants can have on jobs and homelessness. He is also the author of the book The Other Side of the Pyramid, which “challenges the traditional racial dogma of America.” Additionally, Hayes has run unsuccessfully for mayor of Los Angeles, the Los Angeles City Council and the U.S. House of Representatives.

Hayes is the son of a “Buffalo Soldier” who fought in one of the U.S. Army’s formerly segregated regiments. He is a father of four, including 2004 Team USA Olympian Joanna D. Hayes — the winner of the gold medal in the 100-meter hurdles.

Sample of Public Appearances by Ted Hayes:

Project 21, a leading voice of black conservatives for over 25 years, is sponsored by the National Center for Public Policy Research. Its members have been quoted, interviewed or published over 40,000 times since the program was created in 1992. Contributions to the National Center are tax-deductible and greatly appreciated, and may be earmarked exclusively for the use of Project 21.