Eric Cantor “Became an Ideological Mystery” – And That Was a Problem When It Came to the VRAA

QuestionMarkManFacingLeftDPCWjpg“Cantor became an ideological mystery…”

Those five words leapt out at me when I read James Hohmann and Jake Sherman’s “Behind Eric Cantor’s campaign meltdown” in Politico.

Conservatives and other non-racist Americans have been trying for months to get a clear and definitive answer as to where Majority Leader Cantor stood on the Voting Rights Amendment Act of 2014, legislation introduced by Republican Rep. James Sensenbrenner (WI) and ultra-liberals Rep. John Conyers (D-MI) and Senator Patrick Leahy (D-VT).

The legislation would change federal voting rights protections so that non-Hispanic white people formally receive fewer voting rights protections than other voters under federal law.

In the past, the goal of voting rights laws (such as the famous Voting Rights Act of 1965) was to protect everyone equally, regardless of race or national origin.

Cantor apparently was talking with liberals about his views of the legislation, but conservatives were left to guess. That’s not the way it should work with an ostensibly conservative majority leader.

Bonus: If you haven’t seen the video in which James O’Keefe of Project Veritas asks Rep. Sensenbrenner (:53 in the video) about the provision in the legislation singling out white voters for reduced voting rights protection, it’s below, and quite instructive.



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